Tech: VMP Gen2 TVS Supercharger

VMP Gen2 Intro Featured

Edge of Tomorrow

VMP’s second-generation supercharger maximizes 2.3-liter TVS technology

By Steve Turner

Photos courtesy of VMP Superchargers

Since the dawn of the Terminator in 2003, the positive-displacement supercharger has become a mainstay in the lexicon of Ford performance. As the first factory supercharged Mustang, the ’03 Cobra entered the world with an Eaton M112 supercharger, a traditional Roots supercharger that, obviously, displaces 112 cubic inches of air. This configuration ushered in an era of easy supercharger swaps with more efficient blowers easily supplanting the stock unit.

It is finally here. The VMP Gen2 TVS supercharger has arrived. A longtime champion of the Twin Vortices Series blowers, the VMP team worked side-by-side with Roush engineers to create an idealized version of the mainstay 2.3-liter TVS supercharger. It is now available for $2,999 from VMP and it includes a pulley.
It is finally here. The VMP Gen2 TVS supercharger has arrived. A longtime champion of the Twin Vortices Series blowers, the VMP team worked side-by-side with Roush engineers to create an idealized version of the mainstay 2.3-liter TVS supercharger. It is now available for $2,999 from VMP and it includes a pulley.

Even the factory got into the upgrade act, with each generation of a factory-supercharged SVT Mustang receiving an improved supercharger unit. The stock 2007-2012 GT500s rocked the larger Eaton M122 Roots blower. Both of the aforementioned units were traditional Roots units with three-lobe rotors that feature a 60-degree end-to-end twist.

Just to give you how much the Generation II TVS has changed versus its predecessor, look at the orange areas on this CAD drawing. Those are the areas that were refined and improved in the name of superior airflow over the previous generation shown in green. Rather than stuffing bigger rotors into a restrictive case, VMP worked to maximize the airflow to the proven 2.3-liter TVS rotor pack.
Just to give you how much the Generation II TVS has changed versus its predecessor, look at the orange areas on this CAD drawing. Those are the areas that were refined and improved in the name of superior airflow over the previous generation shown in green. Rather than stuffing bigger rotors into a restrictive case, VMP worked to maximize the airflow to the proven 2.3-liter TVS rotor pack.

While these Roots superchargers provided a nice boost in power, they quickly reached the limits of their efficiency as modders spun them harder with smaller pulleys.

Eventually, Ford Racing Performance Parts offered a direct-bolt-on, 2.3-liter upgrade based on a more efficient Eaton design—the Twin Vortices Series. A variation on the Roots design, the TVS is based on two four-lobe rotors. These rotors feature a 160-degree end-to-end twist, which is said to move air in a smoother, more-efficient flow. They are also quieter than traditional Roots units.

For those of us into performance, the reduced noise was of little concern. The increased efficiency, however, meant that modding maniacs could push these blowers harder and create even more power. One such TVS modder is Justin Starkey of VMP Tuning. A noted tuner, he began upgrading TVS superchargers with smaller pulleys. Soon thereafter he offered improved inlet elbows, larger throttle bodies, and more. It escalated to the point that VMP worked with Roush to create a ported version of the 2.3-liter TVS designed to maximize its high-flow elbow and VMP Superchargers was born. Eventually, however, Justin found the limits of that supercharger.

Obviously the changes are many, but some of the specific areas targeted were any interruptions that might inhibit flow, like this EVAP boss protruding into the Gen1 inlet elbow. This is flushed on the integral Gen2 elbow.
Obviously the changes are many, but some of the specific areas targeted were any interruptions that might inhibit flow, like this EVAP boss protruding into the Gen1 inlet elbow. This is flushed on the integral Gen2 elbow.

“The VMP GT500 TVS with the VMP high-flow inlet elbow was my first supercharger back in 2010,” Justin explained. “We were able to take an existing design and make a few small changes to improve its performance. Coupled with our line of VMP elbows and pulleys, this combination offered great performance for the time.”

“Since then we have introduced supercharger upgrades—that are unique, VMP-owned-and-designed castings—for the ’03-’04 Cobra and Roushcharged ’05-’10 Three-Valve 4.6. It seemed like the time to go back and re-tool the GT500 head unit with all that we learned over the years,” he added. “You rarely get a chance to do something over, but it seemed like a no-brainer since the factory TVS on ’13-’14 GT500s had raised the bar considerably, thanks to the efforts of people like Sylvain Brunette (at Billet Pro Shop), Jimmy LaRocca, and Jay Teixeira.”

To increase flow, the new design pushed the discharge lip forward on the Gen2 versus the Gen1 seen here. According to Justin this area is particularly crucial to the Gen2’s performance improvement, as any air that bounces back into the rotors can get reheated, which would clearly bring down the blower’s efficiency.
To increase flow, the new design pushed the discharge lip forward on the Gen2 versus the Gen1 seen here. According to Justin this area is particularly crucial to the Gen2’s performance improvement, as any air that bounces back into the rotors can get reheated, which would clearly bring down the blower’s efficiency.

Working with the proven Eaton 2.3-liter rotor pack, Justin looked to wring every last drop of airflow and efficiency out of the TVS. The goal was to improve flow and reduce inlet restriction without making the installation more difficult or giving up much of anything.

To achieve these goals; Justin worked hand-in-hand with VMP’s longtime engineering partner, Roush Enterprises. It was only natural that they worked together again to further maximize TVS supercharger performance.

Further improving the air chamber, VMP specified that the Gen2 case extend out closer to the EGR while still allowing for its installation. All these revisions and enlargement of the airbox at the rear of the blower were engineered to feed more airflow to the 2.3-liter TVS rotors, especially the one closest to the inlet, which was starved of air in the Gen1 design.
Further improving the air chamber, VMP specified that the Gen2 case extend out closer to the EGR while still allowing for its installation. All these revisions and enlargement of the airbox at the rear of the blower were engineered to feed more airflow to the 2.3-liter TVS rotors, especially the one closest to the inlet, which was starved of air in the Gen1 design.

“With all the hats I wear at VMP, CAD modeler is not one of them. I worked with the engineers and designers at Roush to optimize the TVS from every airflow standpoint,” Justin said. “We were actually able to hit it the target with only a few revisions. From there we had a plastic rapid prototype printed so we would have something to put our hands on while the molds and fixtures were being built.”

This is an example of one of the obstructions that deprived the driver-side rotor of the air it deserved. This internal boss is nonexistent in the Gen2 design, so air from the larger, smoother inlet has an unimpeded path to the rotors. Despite all these changes, the Gen2 TVS shares the same tried-and-true 2.3-liter rotor pack used in the Gen1 TVS supercharger.
This is an example of one of the obstructions that deprived the driver-side rotor of the air it deserved. This internal boss is nonexistent in the Gen2 design, so air from the larger, smoother inlet has an unimpeded path to the rotors. Despite all these changes, the Gen2 TVS shares the same tried-and-true 2.3-liter rotor pack used in the Gen1 TVS supercharger.

As it turned out, the results were well worth all the engineering and testing effort put into this program. Inlet airflow mods have long shown to improve TVS performance, but the completely re-engineered VMP Gen2 inlet delivered beyond even Justin’s expectations.

“The inlet is the most important part. To put things into perspective, there is no larger TVS at this time to step up to. We have to make the most of the 2.3 liters of displacement available to us. We’ve taken a different approach than everyone else in the industry by making the first rear-inlet supercharger (for a front-engine car) that uses a one-piece rotor housing and inlet elbow,” Justin elaborated. “This allowed us to optimize airflow geometry into the rotors in every way possible. The Gen2 no longer starves the inside rotor like older designs, and it maintain laminar flow as much as possible on the short-radius (inside) turn into the rotors. We’ve made this 2.3-liter suck as much air as possible—and produce astonishing numbers— while still keeping the reliability, torque, and economical price point that the 2.3-liter TVS is known for.”

Proven by the test data here, the changes yielded impressive improvements. The Gen2 handily eclipses the VMP Gen1 TVS in performance. However, we bet you are still wondering how it stacks up to the factory Trinity TVS. Well, just stay tuned to SVTP and we’ll bring you the full results of that test in a matter of days.

To achieve its larger area and higher flow, the inlet of the Gen2 supercharger is completely integrated. No longer is there a bolt-on elbow for the throttle body. As such, it is difficult to see just how the size would compare by looking at production blowers. This CAD drawing illustrates how the mounting flange of the Gen1 bolt-on elbow compares to the inlet of the Gen2. Quite simply, the Gen2 inlet dwarfs its predecessor. The inlet of the Gen2 elbow is also 6mm taller and 9mm wider, at 72x154mm, compared to the 66x145mm Gen1 inlet. However, it still allows for a factory throttle body bolt-pattern and O-ring seal.
To achieve its larger area and higher flow, the inlet of the Gen2 supercharger is completely integrated. No longer is there a bolt-on elbow for the throttle body. As such, it is difficult to see just how the size would compare by looking at production blowers. This CAD drawing illustrates how the mounting flange of the Gen1 bolt-on elbow compares to the inlet of the Gen2. Quite simply, the Gen2 inlet dwarfs its predecessor. The inlet of the Gen2 elbow is also 6mm taller and 9mm wider, at 72x154mm, compared to the 66x145mm Gen1 inlet. However, it still allows for a factory throttle body bolt-pattern and O-ring seal.
The only other way to compare this massive difference in inlet volume is to cut off the integral inlet on the Gen2 supercharger. It is obviously impractical to ruin a production unit. Fortunately VMP created a rapid prototype of the Gen2 case, which allowed removal of the elbow section of the inlet. Here you can see that the Gen1 inlet (bottom) is completely outclassed by the Gen2. Given that positive-displacement superchargers loathe inlet restrictions, it would seem the Gen2 TVS would enjoy the unimpeded airflow.
The only other way to compare this massive difference in inlet volume is to cut off the integral inlet on the Gen2 supercharger. It is obviously impractical to ruin a production unit. Fortunately VMP created a rapid prototype of the Gen2 case, which allowed removal of the elbow section of the inlet. Here you can see that the Gen1 inlet (bottom) is completely outclassed by the Gen2. Given that positive-displacement superchargers loathe inlet restrictions, it would seem the Gen2 TVS would enjoy the unimpeded airflow.
So, do all those changes work? Yes they do. From the jump the Gen2 TVS outflows VMP’s first-generation unit, which was already optimized over a standard-issue 2.3 TVS. At its peak, the Gen2 TVS offers an 18-percent improvement in airflow versus the prior generation. It is about 8 percent better than the later factory TVS built for the ’13-’14 GT500’s Trinity 5.8. The Trinity TVS seemed to take heed of and expand on aftermarket TVS improvements like the first-generation VMP TVS.
So, do all those changes work? Yes they do. From the jump the Gen2 TVS outflows VMP’s first-generation unit, which was already optimized over a standard-issue 2.3 TVS. At its peak, the Gen2 TVS offers an 18-percent improvement in airflow versus the prior generation. It is about 8 percent better than the later factory TVS built for the ’13-’14 GT500’s Trinity 5.8. The Trinity TVS seemed to take heed of and expand on aftermarket TVS improvements like the first-generation VMP TVS.
Here is a close-up look at the inlet that allows all this airflow magic to happen. The Gen2 breathing path was completely revamped in the name of airflow. VMP worked with Roush to take out the floor, raise the roof, and reshape the curve of the inlet. Flow improved by 18 percent, but the Gen2 TVS still offers the user-friendly bolt-on experience that made the Gen1 version so popular.
Here is a close-up look at the inlet that allows all this airflow magic to happen. The Gen2 breathing path was completely revamped in the name of airflow. VMP worked with Roush to take out the floor, raise the roof, and reshape the curve of the inlet. Flow improved by 18 percent, but the Gen2 TVS still offers the user-friendly, bolt-on experience that made the Gen1 version so popular.
You’ve come a long way TVS. Here its two cousins frame the first-generation VMP TVS supercharger. To the right is the Trinity TVS, which was factory optimized for the larger 5.8-liter engine in the ’13-’14 GT500, and, to the left, the Gen2 takes the 2.3-liter TVS technology to a whole new level.
You’ve come a long way TVS. Here its two cousins frame the first-generation VMP TVS supercharger. To the right is the Trinity TVS, which was factory optimized for the larger 5.8-liter engine in the ’13-’14 GT500, and, to the left, the Gen2 takes the 2.3-liter TVS technology to a whole new level.
The 2007 Shelby GT500, owned by VMP Tuning’s own BJ McCarty, was the lucky recipient of the first production VMP Gen2 TVS. (Somebody has to test these things!) In an A-to-B test versus the first-generation VMP TVS the Gen2 produced incredible 51.14 horsepower and 47.67 lb-ft peak gains at the rear wheels! Additionally, the peak boost jumped up by a whopping 2.37 psi.
The 2007 Shelby GT500, owned by VMP Tuning’s own BJ McCarty, was the lucky recipient of the first production VMP Gen2 TVS. (Somebody has to test these things!) In an A-to-B test versus the first-generation VMP TVS the Gen2 produced incredible 51.14 horsepower and 47.67 lb-ft peak gains at the rear wheels! Additionally, the peak boost jumped up by a whopping 2.37 psi.
An advantage of both generations of the VMP TVS is this bolt-on pulley hub. It allows for quick swaps of pulleys to dial in your boost level for any occasion. VMP offers 2.4-, 2.5-, 2.6-, 2.8, and 3-inch pulleys, which will deliver 18, 17, 16, 14, and 12 psi respectively. When augmented by a 10- or 15-percent overdriven crank damper, the Gen 2 can belt out an additional 2-4 psi.
An advantage of both generations of the VMP TVS is this bolt-on pulley hub. It allows for quick swaps of pulleys to dial in your boost level for any occasion. VMP offers 2.4-, 2.5-, 2.6-, 2.8, and 3-inch pulleys, which will deliver 18, 17, 16, 14, and 12 psi respectively. When augmented by a 10- or 15-percent overdriven crank damper, the Gen 2 can belt out an additional 2-4 psi.
BJ’s trusty VMP TVS had served him well. When paired with a VMP TwinJet 67mm throttle body, a 2.4-inch pulley, Dynatech long-tube headers, an Afco heat exchanger, a VMP tune, and the necessary fuel upgrades, it laid down solid baselines of 673.49 horsepower and 675.18 lb-ft of torque despite having 4.10 gears out back.
BJ’s trusty VMP TVS had served him well. When paired with a VMP TwinJet 67mm throttle body, a 2.4-inch pulley, Dynatech long-tube headers, an Afco heat exchanger, a VMP tune, and the necessary fuel upgrades, it laid down solid baselines of 673.49 horsepower and 675.18 lb-ft of torque despite having 4.10 gears out back.
Any VMP TVS swap is a plug-and-play proposition, and Justin Starkey has enough experience with this swap to do it in his sleep. Fortunately, BJ was on hand to supervise just in case Justin needed some tips. Seriously, even if you haven’t done it before, this is a straightforward swap.
Any VMP TVS swap is a plug-and-play proposition, and Justin Starkey has enough experience with this swap to do it in his sleep. Fortunately, BJ was on hand to supervise just in case Justin needed some tips. Seriously, even if you haven’t done it before, this is a straightforward swap.
To ensure an accurate A-to-B comparison, VMP’s Steven Cleveland swapped over the same TwinJet 67mm throttle body and 2.4-inch pulley while Justin reattached all the necessary connections.
To ensure an accurate A-to-B comparison, VMP’s Steven Cleveland swapped over the same TwinJet 67mm throttle body and 2.4-inch pulley while Justin reattached all the necessary connections.
Here is the completed Gen2 install on BJ’s 2007 Shelby GT500. Breathing through a JLT Big Air CAI the Gen2 unit is ready to flow. It looks downright factory, and only the truly knowledgeable, a.k.a. SVTP readers, will know you are rocking Gen2 power under the hood.
Here is the completed Gen2 install on BJ’s 2007 Shelby GT500. Breathing through a JLT Big Air CAI the Gen2 unit is ready to flow. It looks downright factory, and only the truly knowledgeable, a.k.a. SVTP readers, will know you are rocking Gen2 power under the hood.
Born of Justin’s tuning prowess, VMP Tuning eventually expanded into one of the foremost TVS supercharger proponents. Often Justin puts these two skills to good use. Here he simply ensures that the tune in BJ’s car is ready to support the additional flow offered by the Gen2 TVS.
Born of Justin’s tuning prowess, VMP Tuning eventually expanded into one of the foremost TVS supercharger proponents. Often Justin puts these two skills to good use. Here he simply ensures that the tune in BJ’s car is ready to support the additional flow offered by the Gen2 TVS.
Here’s what you’ve been waiting for. These are the before and after dyno pulls. Obviously all of the Gen2 engineering efforts paid off in the real world. It pulls harder across the entire powerband. That’s a gain you can really feel, and BJ seems to approve of its real-world production. “As if the low-end grunt of the Gen1 wasn’t enough, now I have over 50 more lb-ft of torque at 3,500 rpm,” BJ enthused. “We all just shook our heads when we saw the numbers, particularly because I run dyno-unfriendly 4.10s. …This thing is a beast.”
Here’s what you’ve been waiting for. These are the before and after dyno pulls. Obviously all of the Gen2 engineering efforts paid off in the real world. It pulls harder across the entire powerband. That’s a gain you can really feel, and BJ seems to approve of its real-world production. “As if the low-end grunt of the Gen1 wasn’t enough, now I have over 50 more lb-ft of torque at 3,500 rpm,” BJ enthused. “We all just shook our heads when we saw the numbers, particularly because I run dyno-unfriendly 4.10s. …This thing is a beast.”
While the graph offers a higher resolution of data and shows the true peaks, this chart further illustrates the gains across the powerband. As you can see, the gains are significant from the beginning of the pull all the way to redline. The next step is to see how the Gen2 stacks up to the Trinity TVS, so stay tuned to SVTP for the rest of the story…

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25 thoughts on “Tech: VMP Gen2 TVS Supercharger”

  1. Soooo… The question remains, when will the 11-14 5.0’s get this blower?? Id think VMP could make a killer on this with our 5.0’s so any plans or ETA’s as of yet?? Thanks,

    1. GT500 right now….some cool things down the road. As for Cobra, much of what we have in GEN II is already baked into our COBRA TVS with VMP high flow elbow and VMP monoblade throttle body. The Cobra unit is fairly new and we have a ton of them on the road and track. bj

  2. Is that $2,999 the correct price or is it $3,999 like on the website.

    Looks like the 800HP kit is $3999…includes TB and injectors

    If you get just the GEN II by itself it’s $2999

    1. Correct on pricing. GEN II is $2,999. $3,999 is the 800 hp kit with GEN II, VMP 67mm Twin Jet throttle body, 56# injectors, 2.40-inch pulley, 90mm idler, NGK TR7ix plugs, X4 SCT tuner and VMP Custom Calibration.

  3. Another awesome write up & another awesome product from VMP!… So asked hoping, any news on a unit for any 5.0s or even ones for the 2V & 4Vs 4.6s? … Gonna happen, in the works, or ETAs? Cuz this def looks like it can sway me from my Procharger “roots” 😉

  4. And I’d be dying to be a test mule on my bolt-on 5.0 ’13 , or bolt-on old 5.0s ’88 or ’94, or my completely built & procharged 4.6 2V ’01 …. My local shop is Blow-By Racing in Boca Raton, FL …. ~Ross

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