Tech: Lethal Performance Raptor, Part 2

Lethal Raptor, Part 2, Featured

Alpha Predator

Lethal Performance boosts SVT’s Raptor higher up the food chain with a Whipple supercharger

By Steve Turner

Photos by SID297 and StacyStangz

With any luck you tuned in for our first installment on Lethal Performance’s 2012 Crew Cab Raptor project. In that story we documented the lighting and skidplate upgrades. However, this time we are getting to the exciting part—adding more performance.

When we last checked in on Lethal Performance’s 2012 Crew Cab Raptor, the truck was Lethalized with upgraded lighting and a more robust Ford Racing skid plate. Here it is up on the dyno at Power by the Hour Performance in Boca Raton, Florida. The truck’s naturally aspirated 6.2-liter engine baselined at 304.92 horsepower and 337.66 lb-ft of torque at the tires.
When we last checked in on Lethal Performance’s 2012 Crew Cab Raptor, the truck was Lethalized with upgraded lighting and a more robust Ford Racing skid plate. Here it is up on the dyno at Power by the Hour Performance in Boca Raton, Florida. The truck’s naturally aspirated 6.2-liter engine baselined at 304.92 horsepower and 337.66 lb-ft of torque at the tires.

If you know anything about the Team Lethal bunch, you know that they have no reservations about tearing into spankin’ new Fords and launching the performance of these vehicles into the stratosphere. Heretofore, most of these vehicles have been Mustangs, but these guys love all sorts of Fords—especially trucks. So, it’s no shock that Lethal’s Jared Rosen added an SVT Raptor to his driveway.

One handy aspect of modding a truck is you can easily throw all your new gear in the bed and haul it to your favorite install spot. Lethal Performance’s Jared Rosen ordered up a Whipple supercharger and a full exhaust from American Racing Headers to ramp up the performance of the Lethal Raptor.
One handy aspect of modding a truck is you can easily throw all your new gear in the bed and haul it to your favorite install spot. Lethal Performance’s Jared Rosen ordered up a Whipple supercharger and a full exhaust from American Racing Headers to ramp up the performance of the Lethal Raptor.

“The driving force behind it was that we just wanted something to have a good time with. We’d seen videos of people off-roading with them so we said why not. Let’s get one,” Jared explained in our last installment. “Turns out that the Raptor market was growing pretty quickly as we took delivery of it so it was a great opportunity not only to have an awesome time with but to showcase parts that the manufacturers we deal with wanted to showcase…”

Of course, you also know they love forced induction. From nitrous to blowers to turbos, Lethal has thrown everything at new Fords to improve performance. However, as one of Whipple Supercharger’s highest volume distributors, it is no surprise that Jared looked no further than the Whipple’s Raptor supercharger system to boost its truck project.

As the highest volume distributor of Whipple Superchargers, Team Lethal surprised no one by selecting one of its 2.9-liter Whipple tuner kit for the company’s Raptor project. This kit (PN WHP-LP-FSERIES62LSTG1SC-B; $8,039) includes the needed 47 lb/hr injectors, NGK spark plugs, SCT tuner, and Lund Racing tune to push the power even higher.
As the highest volume distributor of Whipple Superchargers, Team Lethal surprised no one by selecting a 2.9-liter Whipple tuner kit for the company’s Raptor project. This kit (PN WHP-LP-FSERIES62LSTG1SC-B; $8,039) includes the needed 47 lb/hr injectors, NGK spark plugs, SCT tuner, and Lund Racing tune to push the power even higher.

“What would a Lethal project vehicle be without a Whipple supercharger?” Jared quipped. “I mean we have to be fair to all of our vehicles. So if one gets Whipple’d so does the other. We wouldn’t want any of our cars or trucks to feel less than the other.”

We were on hand to check out the installation and testing of the system as handled at Power by the Hour in Boynton Beach, Florida. After the installation, Ken Bjonnes of Lund Racing dialed in a custom tune to make the marriage between Whipple at Raptor a happy one. So, keep reading and see how the 2.9-liter supercharger and a complete American Racing Headers’ exhaust transformed the performance of Ford SVT’s four-wheel-drive machine.

“The difference after the Whipple install was night and day from stock. I guess that’s what over 170rwhp gains do to a truck that’s already a beast,” Jared explained. “Not only is there a very noticeable difference in power but hearing the sound of a Whipple twin-screw scream when you put the pedal to the floor is music to my ears.”

If you are going to force a lot of air into a 6.2-liter engine, it’s a great idea to open up the exhaust side of the equation. To pop the cork, Team Lethal selected American Racing Headers’ 1 7/8-inch long-tube headers and Y-pipe (PN ARH-RPTR78NC; $1,590) and full after-cat exhaust (PN ARH-RPTRCTBK11; $1,295).
If you are going to force a lot of air into a 6.2-liter engine, it’s a great idea to open up the exhaust side of the equation. To pop the cork, Team Lethal selected American Racing Headers’ 1 7/8-inch long-tube headers and Y-pipe (PN ARH-RPTR78NC; $1,590) and full after-cat exhaust (PN ARH-RPTRCTBK11; $1,295).

 

With the hardware installation complete, all that’s left is the tuning. Lethal Performance offers Lund Racing tunes, and Lund Racing’s own Ken Bjonnes does a lot of tuning on the Power by the Hour Dynojet, so he was on hand to whip up a custom tune to make the Lethal Raptor play nice with its new Whipple supercharger.
With the hardware installation complete, all that’s left is the tuning. Lethal Performance offers Lund Racing tunes, and Lund Racing’s own Ken Bjonnes does a lot of tuning on the Power by the Hour Dynojet, so he was on hand to whip up a custom tune to make the Lethal Raptor play nice with its new Whipple supercharger.
Yes, picking up nearly 180 horsepower and 100 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheels is the kind of gain you want to see from a blower and exhaust upgrade. However, it is not just he peak numbers to get worked up about. It’s the giant lift in the entire powerband that will make you smile every time you stomp on the loud pedal. “Down here in South Florida there's a ton of sand and black mud on our off-road trails,” Jared explained. “So the additional power that we gained from the 2.9-liter Whipple allowed us to move much quicker through that type of terrain and prevented us from ever getting stuck. Personally, I just feel a lot more confident going out there with the extra power then I did when it was stock.”
Yes, picking up nearly 180 horsepower and 100 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheels is the kind of gain you want to see from a blower and exhaust upgrade. However, it is not just he peak numbers to get worked up about. It’s the giant lift in the entire powerband that will make you smile every time you stomp on the loud pedal. “Down here in South Florida there’s a ton of sand and black mud on our off-road trails,” Jared explained. “So the additional power that we gained from the 2.9-liter Whipple allowed us to move much quicker through that type of terrain and prevented us from ever getting stuck. Personally, I just feel a lot more confident going out there with the extra power then I did when it was stock.”
A closer look at the raw numbers shows you just how significant the Whipple gains are across the entire powerband. Comparing both runs from where the pedal is on the floor, the steam picks up right away and builds quickly carrying the usable power well past the peak of the stock 6.2.
A closer look at the raw numbers shows you just how significant the Whipple gains are across the entire powerband. Comparing both runs from where the pedal is on the floor, the steam picks up right away and builds quickly carrying the usable power well past the peak of the stock 6.2.

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5 thoughts on “Tech: Lethal Performance Raptor, Part 2”

  1. Wow.

    I love hardware and this writeup has a whole lotta love. Nice to see so many production/GT500 parts in use.

    A few questions. I know Buddy Bar does casting work for Whipple. Did they do the lower manifold used in this application?
    http://www.buddybarcasting.com/uploads/2010_BB_Cat.pdf

    What is triggering the intercooler pump to go on in this application as the PCM wouldn’t be doing it (as for example it does on a GT500 via a temperature programmed in the tune). Is it simply triggered by a temperature sensor? And lastly, in this photo I get the idea that this blower is a FRPP piece…

    http://www.svtperformance.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/3-Lethal-Raptor-Part-2-1024×770.jpg

    But it isn’t, correct? It’s a Lethal only offering at this point, no?

  2. Now that makes sense.

    Had I a Raptor I’d definitely be considering each one of the additions you covered in this thread. That blower is a beautiful piece and the supporting hardware looks to be first rate. Sure would have been nice if FRPP would have picked this one up and added it to their catalog but Raptor owners should be thankful for the effort Jared and Whipple have put forth here.

  3. Glad to see they went with a Whipple over a turbo kit. The hellion kit is pretty badass, but I’d rather my truck have lots of low end power and instant torque throughout the powerband.

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