Tech: New Edge Coyote Swap

After considering an upgrade to the stock Two-Valve 4.6, owner David Lovejoy wisely opted swap it out in favor of a Coyote crate engine from Ford Racing. The fully functional swap make for quite a dramatic difference in the performance of his 2004 Mustang GT.

Hawaii 5.0

Pro Dyno performs a clean Coyote  swap in a 2004 Mustang GT

By Steve Turner
Photos courtesy of Jeremy Marler/Pro Dyno

It’s common for project cars to take on a life of their won. For David Lovejoy, he was ready to drive off into the sunset of retirement. However, before he left, he really wanted to make his Mustang GT more fun to drive. While he loved his car, he craved the performance offered by modern Mustangs.

After considering an upgrade to the stock Two-Valve 4.6, owner David Lovejoy wisely opted swap it out in favor of a Coyote crate engine from Ford Racing. The fully functional swap make for quite a dramatic difference in the performance of his 2004 Mustang GT.
After considering an upgrade to the stock Two-Valve 4.6, owner David Lovejoy wisely opted swap it out in favor of a Coyote crate engine from Ford Racing. The fully functional swap make for quite a dramatic difference in the performance of his 2004 Mustang GT.

“I have been in love with Mustangs for all of my adult life. My favorite was a ’94 GT that I had for eight years and 313,000 miles. At that time it was the only new American car that I had ever owned. Therefore, going into retirement I was looking for a clean, low-mileage ’04 GT. Since I owned the first model of the SN95, I just decided that I would like to get the last year that it was in production and make the car something special!” David explained. “After I drove the car, it was obvious that the 4.6 Two-Valve had to go. It just did not produce the power I was looking for, and if we could make all the systems communicate with each other then to me the Coyote was the way to go.”

While the swap is pretty straightforward, it certainly helps to have a lift and a fully equipped shop like Pro Dyno does.
While the swap is pretty straightforward, it certainly helps to have a lift and a fully equipped shop like Pro Dyno does.

“David loved his 2004 and was getting ready to retire to Hawaii. He wanted to do some work before he left. He originally came to us to discuss building the stock Two-Valve motor,” Dan Desio of Pro Dyno added. “After realizing he was only looking at 350 to 375 rear-wheel horsepower, we decided on a Coyote swap as the best decision for what he was looking for.”

Despite the cost of this swap, it was a wise choice. Building up a Two-Valve to run with a Coyote is definitely possible. It is a cool way to go, but doing so would require a considerable investment as well, and David did not want a power adder. Opting to swap in the modern 5.0 not only adds the performance, but it still gives your car a unique personality.

“I absolutely love the car! There are two elements that made this so. The first and most important was picking the right company to do the job. Dan and his guys at Pro Dyno were just incredible, and they were simply up to every challenge that was thrown their way,” David said. “The second item was that this was a total systems conversion including engine, transmission , suspension, brakes, exhaust, rearend, and clutch just to mention a few.”

While it is perfectly serviceable, the Two-Valve 4.6-liter V-8 that powered ’96-’04 Mustang GTs won’t go down in history as one of the most feared performers. While it picked up some oomph from the Performance Improved induction upgrades in ’99, this version of the 4.6-liter needs forced induction to keep pace with modern Mustang engines. Even upgraded with headers, David’s 4.6 left him wanting more.
While it is perfectly serviceable, the Two-Valve 4.6-liter V-8 that powered ’96-’04 Mustang GTs won’t go down in history as one of the most feared performers. While it picked up some oomph from the Performance Improved induction upgrades in ’99, this version of the 4.6-liter needs forced induction to keep pace with modern Mustang engines. Even upgraded with headers, David’s 4.6 left him wanting more.

The relative rarity of these swaps, some of which can be attributed to the cost, is what makes these combinations so cool. If you pop your hood at a cruise night and the onlookers see a built Two-Valve, they will expect it. When they instead see a clean Coyote swap, it is going to get a conversation started. The number one question will be about the difficulty of the swap.

“The swap itself was very straightforward, the tricky part of the swap was all of the wiring, getting everything from the ’04 to work with the Coyote motor. The hardest was getting the gauges, tach, and speedometer to work correctly,” Dan said. “Once that was achieved our biggest challenge was making everything seem factory, as if nothing was done to the car from a comfort and driveability standpoint.”

While David considered building up his Two-Valve he eventually decided to go full-Coyote after discussing the possibilities with the Pro Dyno crew. Of course the most efficient way to start a swap like this is to detach the suspension, K-member, wiring, and fuel system. Then you, using a lift, you can raise the car and leave the engine and K-member on the ground.
While David considered building up his Two-Valve he eventually decided to go full-Coyote after discussing the possibilities with the Pro Dyno crew. Of course the most efficient way to start a swap like this is to detach the suspension, K-member, wiring, and fuel system. Then you, using a lift, you can raise the car and leave the engine and K-member on the ground.

Bringing that smooth, modern driveability and all the conveniences that go along with it is definitely the way to go. Of course, what David really wanted out of the swap was increased performance. In that regard, he definitely got what he was seeking.

“It was very cool, as you do not see too many of these swaps. We’ve seen a few Fox-body swaps, and a Ranger, but none into a New Edge,” Dan added. “The power is there, and so much room to grow if David were ever to go with a blower setup, than if he had kept the stock Two-Valve. So it’s a New Edge with a new attitude!”

It sounds like a great attitude to drive into retirement with. Who wouldn’t love to wheel Project Coyote New Edge on twisty road along the Hawaiian coastline?

David and Pro Dyno selected Ford Racing’s naturally aspirated Coyote Aluminator (PN M-6007-A50NA; $8,879). This robust, 11:1-compression engine fortifies the basic Coyote architecture with Mahle forged pistons, Manley H-beam connecting rods, Boss 302 connecting rod bearings, Boss 302 valve springs, and more. Of course, to swap it into David’s New Edge, they also selected the Ford Racing Control Pack (PN M-6017-A504V; $1,899.99) and the Ford Racing alternator kit.
David and Pro Dyno selected Ford Racing’s naturally aspirated Coyote Aluminator (PN M-6007-A50NA; $8,879). This robust, 11:1-compression engine fortifies the basic Coyote architecture with Mahle forged pistons, Manley H-beam connecting rods, Boss 302 connecting rod bearings, Boss 302 valve springs, and more. Of course, to swap it into David’s New Edge, they also selected the Ford Racing Control Pack (PN M-6017-A504V; $1,899.99) and the Ford Racing alternator kit.

“My wife, Lori and I have moved to Hawaii, and what a great place to enjoy my Mustang! She is a great top-down cruiser and goes from 0 to 45 pretty fast too!” David enthused. “At the present time, I am just going to enjoy the car as is. She is everything that I had envisioned and more. Thanks Dan!”

When you see this big a gap between the baseline graph and the post-mod graph, you know you have made a great choice. Such is the case for David Lovejoy’s Project Coyote New Edge. Before the swap, the modest Two-Valve 4.6 created 260.62 horsepower and 301.19 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheels. With addition of a Coyote underhood, his car picked up an additional 136.59 hp and 81.68 lb-ft at the feet.
When you see this big a gap between the baseline graph and the post-mod graph, you know you have made a great choice. Such is the case for David Lovejoy’s Project Coyote New Edge. Before the swap, the modest Two-Valve 4.6 created 260.62 horsepower and 301.19 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheels. With addition of a Coyote underhood, his car picked up an additional 136.59 hp and 81.68 lb-ft at the feet.

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6 thoughts on “Tech: New Edge Coyote Swap”

  1. Great write-up, Steve! I just got a Comp Orange ’04 GT that I’ll be doing this swap with eventually. I wonder why they used the Vintage Air kit instead of the Power By The Hour bracket kit?

  2. A bolt-on blower for a Two-Valve would put it at the same power level. Yeah, sure, the swap factor is pretty cool but I’d be hoping for more power than that. A built Two-Valve with a blower would have been a cheaper route and netted more power…

    I guess the N/A ability of the car is what he was after. Swap looks great though and love that PCM bracket. Work of art.

  3. A bolt on blower for a 2 valve would put it at the same power level. Yeah sure the swap factor is pretty cool but id be hoping for more power than that. Built 2 valve with a blower would have been a cheaper route and netted more power…

    I guess the N/A ability of the car is what he was after. Swap looks great though and love that PCM bracket. Work of art.

    Is this just a stock internals Coyote? If so, this seriously puzzles me… why would you spend all that time and money just to swap one unbuilt N/A motor for another? Sure the N/A motor makes 136 more HP, but if your gonna do a motor swap, at least put a “built” motor in it. This way if you want to make “real” power later you can.

    I don’t know… I’m a high altitude guy, so unbuilt N/A motors are basically worthless to me.

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