News: Inside Ken Block’s Hoonicorn

0 RxSpeed Hoonicorn Featured

Seven Layers

RxSpeed.com gets the inside story of Ken Block’s insane 1965 Mustang—the star of Gymkhana Seven

By Steve Turner
Photos courtesy of RxSpeed.com

Normally we focus our coverage on the more modern side of Ford performance, but when it comes to an all-wheel-drive 1965 Mustang with a 410-cube Roush-Yates racing engine tearing up the streets of Los Angeles, we can’t help but take notice.

How do you fit a 410-cubic-inch Roush-Yates small-block and a Sadev sequential gearbox into a 1965 Mustang? Very carefully, and RxSpeed has all the juicy details.
How do you fit a 410-cubic-inch Roush-Yates small-block and a Sadev sequential gearbox into a 1965 Mustang? Very carefully, and RxSpeed.com has all the juicy details.

As cool, as the spectacle of Gymkhana Seven was, we were intrigued by what it took to build the machine that Ken Block piloted in the video.

Fortunately, the crew at RxSpeed.com have just unveiled an in-depth look at technical details of this impressive ’Stang.

If you aren’t one of the 20 million people that watched Gymkhana Seven, or you would just like to relive it again (and who could blame you), here’s the video in all its glory:

That was pretty awesome, right. Well, did you know that the 1965 Mustang star of the show was built in secret for two years a AutoSport Dynamics in Charlotte, North Carolina. That is the same outfit that preps all off Vaughn Gittin Jr.’s drift machines, and Vaughn too had a hand in the creation of the Hoonicorn Mustang.

    The best news revealed in the RxSpeed piece is that we will see Ken Block’s Hoonicorn ride again.
The best news revealed in the RxSpeed piece is that we will see Ken Block’s Hoonicorn ride again.

We don’t want to steal, RxSpeed.com’s thunder, so you will have to bounce over to their story to read all the details, but we will say the tale of cramming a big-cube V-8 and a Sadev sequential gearbox into a classic Mustang is an impressive one.

“It really came down to packaging: We had a big-ass V8 engine, and we had diffs that had to be in front of it,” Vaughn told RxSpeed.com. “Sadev was proven. Packaging became the challenge.”

So, head over and check out their piece on the Hoonicorn. Perhaps even better than the technical information revealed in the story is the hint that we haven’t seen the last of this amazing Mustang.

The Hoonicorn’s inboard, double-wishbone pushrod suspension was designed to work, not just for Gymkhana, but for some form of competition as well.
The Hoonicorn’s inboard, double-wishbone pushrod suspension was designed to work, not just for Gymkhana, but for some form of competition as well.
Clearly there was a lot to the construction of the Hoonicorn, for more on all the juicy technical details, check out the story on RxSpeed.com.
Clearly there was a lot to the construction of the Hoonicorn, for more on all the technical details, check out the story on RxSpeed.com.

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

2,011 views