Video: Borla Induction Coyote Dyno

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Borla builds up a Coyote crate engine to 515 naturally aspirated horsepower

By Steve Turner
Photos courtesy of Borla

There is no arguing that individual throttles are sexy. There’s just something about stack injection that gets your automotive blood pumping. When we saw the Borla Induction’s V8 Kit Ford Coyote Throttles Kit with Vertical Stacks at the SEMA Show a few years back, we couldn’t help but fantasize about what it would be like to see at Coyote running a full tilt with this intake onboard.

Looking for an old-school hot rod look for your Coyote crate engine? Borla Induction’s stack injection manifold for the modern 5.0-liter looks awesome, and it comes ready to run.
Looking for an old-school hot rod look for your Coyote crate engine? Borla Induction’s stack injection manifold for the modern 5.0-liter looks awesome, and it comes ready to run.

Thanks to the glory of the Internet, we can step right inside the dyno cell at Duttweiler Performance to see the Borla Induction setup (PN 200126; $6,495) put to the test.

They set up a stock Coyote crate engine with the intake and its supporting F.A.S.T. electronic fuel injection. On the back side, a set of Borla headers (PN 17263; $1,055.99) and a pair of Borla mufflers (PN 40575; $311.99) do work.

When you watch the video, we think you’ll agree that hearing the Borla setup run on the dyno lives up to the fantasy. Check it out here:

With nothing more than the Borla Induction setup, a tuned EFI system, and a free-flowing exhaust, the naturally aspirated Coyote produced 515 horsepower! Having watched this system run, we can’t help but start the fantasy all over again. What would this system be like when paired with the new Shelby GT350’s flat-plane-crank 5.2-liter engine?

To demonstrate the efficacy of its induction system, Borla setup a stock Coyote crate engine with the intake and a matching set of Borla headers and mufflers.
To demonstrate the efficacy of its induction system, Borla setup a stock Coyote crate engine with the intake and a matching set of Borla headers and mufflers.
The company took the opportunity to do a little durability testing of its long-tube headers on the dyno by dialing back timing and adding in fuel.
The company took the opportunity to do a little durability testing of its long-tube headers on the dyno by dialing back timing and adding in fuel.
With just the Borla Induction intake, a set of Borla long-tube headers, and a pair of Borla XR1, this 2014 Coyote crate engine cranked out 515 naturally aspirated horsepower.
With just the Borla Induction intake, a set of Borla long-tube headers, and a pair of Borla XR1, this 2014 Coyote crate engine cranked out 515 naturally aspirated horsepower.

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2 thoughts on “Video: Borla Induction Coyote Dyno”

  1. Explain how this works. Is there no MAF to measure the incoming air? Is there some sort of air filter/s that sits on-top of the throttles? I see the fuel rails and injectors, is the injector timing controlled by the PCM and by how much air is being sucked in? Interesting for sure but I don’t see how this will work with the O2 sensors/cats and stay emissions compliant. Thanks in advance.

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