Tech: Shelby GT350 Intake Test

0 Shelby GT350 Intake Test Featured

Shelby Swap

An SVTP member swaps the Voodoo intake on his Coyote with great results

By Steve Turner
Photos courtesy of Alex Sanderson

From the moment we got our eyes on the Shelby GT350’s Voodoo engine, we wondered if its free-flowing intake manifold, cylinder heads, and such would be a viable upgrade path for owners of Coyote 5.0-liter engines. As it turns out, they definitely will. While the heads will require some special cams to work on a cross-plane engine, the intake and its companion throttle body are a direct bolt-on for the 5.0-liter engine despite its slightly larger, taller runners.

This is the Ford Performance Parts GT350 5.2-liter Coyote Intake Manifold (PN M-9424-M52; $1,495). SVTP member Alex Sanderson scored on eBay and his car became the test bed for what looks like will become a popular upgrade for Coyote 5.0-liter engines. You will also have to run the GT350 87mm throttle body and a custom calibration to make it work on your ’15-and-newer Mustang GT.
This is the Ford Performance Parts GT350 5.2-liter Coyote Intake Manifold (PN M-9424-M52; $1,495). SVTP member Alex Sanderson scored on eBay and his car became the test bed for what looks like will become a popular upgrade for Coyote 5.0-liter engines. You will also have to run the GT350 87mm throttle body and a custom calibration to make it work on your ’15-and-newer Mustang GT.

With Ford Performance Parts recently adding the GT350 5.2-liter Coyote Intake Manifold (PN M-9424-M52; $1,495) to its roster of products, SVTP member Alex Sanderson set out to try this intake upgrade on his 2015 Mustang GT, which already featured a Steeda cold-air intake, an X-pipe in place of the factory resonator, and a pair of Magnaflow mufflers.

“…The real magic is inside this intake, a little less precise, but inside both manifolds are the two support posts, on the Coyote, these look to be almost an inch in diameter whereas the GT350 posts look to be about 3/8,” Alex, a.k.a. sandeale, explained. “The runners where they meet the plenum are much larger in height. I managed four fingers wide with wiggle room on the GT350 whereas to get the same amount of wiggle I could only manage three fingers in the OEM intake.”

Alex spent a lot of time comparing his stock manifold with the Shelby GT350 intake, which has larger, taller runners. Be sure you click over to his forum thread to see all of his measurements and feedback on this intake.
Alex spent a lot of time comparing his stock manifold with the Shelby GT350 intake, which has larger, taller runners. Be sure you click over to his forum thread to see all of his measurements and feedback on this intake.

Rather than install a taller Boss or Cobra Jet intake manifold, he wanted more performance in a stealthy package. It turns out the GT350 intake was just what he needed.

“The inspiration came from my lack of interest in lowering the engine which could lead to fitment issues with new components (headers, possible forced induction), removing the OE strut-tower brace, and having to possibly cut into the hood,” Alex said. “And, I prefer being unique. This could have bit me in the rear, but paid off in dividends.”

As you can see in this video, the car made some really impressive peak-to-peak gains and kept pulling much harder to the 7,500-rpm rev limit…

The GT350 intake looks right at home under Alex’s hood and it is supported by a Steeda cold-air intake and a Lund Racing 93-octane Flex Fuel calibration. Before adding the intake, he also opened up the exhaust with an X-pipe in place of the factory resonator and a pair of Magnaflow mufflers.
The GT350 intake looks right at home under Alex’s hood and it is supported by a Steeda cold-air intake and a Lund Racing 93-octane Flex Fuel calibration. Before adding the intake, he also opened up the exhaust with an X-pipe in place of the factory resonator and a pair of Magnaflow mufflers.

Pulling harder at the top of the tach is great, but it’s better yet that this new combination doesn’t give up anything in the way of streetabilty thanks to a revised Lund Racing Flex Fuel calibration.

“Daily driving the car driveability is similar to the OEM manifold,” he added. “But the increase in power is evident when it’s called on for passing power or the occasional hoonery.”

For more on Alex’s intake swap, be sure to check out his thread on our forum.

While the peak-to-peak gains with the manifold and revised calibration were definitely stout at 35.04 horsepower and 3.7 lb-ft of torque, the Shelby GT350 intake definitely pulled much harder at the top of the tach, picking up over 55 horsepower and over 39 lb-ft of torque at 7,300 rpm.
While the peak-to-peak gains with the manifold and revised calibration were definitely stout at 35.04 horsepower and 3.7 lb-ft of torque, the Shelby GT350 intake definitely pulled much harder at the top of the tach, picking up over 55 horsepower and over 39 lb-ft of torque at 7,300 rpm.

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