Any electricians? Need some advise.

1QWK96GT

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Good afternoon everybody,

I recent picked up a hot tub I want to install.
The hot tub calls for #6 awg copper wire and a 50 amp breaker.

I have a bunch of #4 awg aluminum wire.

the board on the hot tub has terminals that will only accept a #6 awg cooper wire.

Can I run the #4 awg aluminum wire to the tub and transition to the #6 awg copper using a aluminum butt splice?

kinda like the one pictured:

ee34ec9d65db2f10337d9e77adf08f19.jpg


I was also going to encase the whole thing in heat shrink tubing.

any help/advise is appreciated.

thanks in advance.
 

shurur

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The real person to ask on this is the one who is going to inspect it. And someone will eventually look at it.

I don't like AL for anything anywhere...especially inside.
I even had the outside feed lines to my panels changed over to CU. I wouldn't run AL inside anything.

The fixture has a setup for copper line for a reason.

We have a few licensed electicians on SVTP.
They will show up to comment.
 

Tractorman

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Not an electrician, but do enough of my own wiring on the farm. I would say you would be ok, not sure about any codes. Aluminum in that size should handle that load easily, depending on the length of run. AL wire can't be all bad, they use it for overhead service all the time and connect it up with copper to bring it inside.
 

blk02edge

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Aluminum is 100% fine when you use the Deox compound. 100% of the issues are from people who don't and the dissimilar metals corrode and when the contact gets weak it gets hot. (Its always at the connection, not the wire itself)

You are fine doing what you are doing, just use the proper deox (Penetrox) and make sure your connections are nice and tight. Use Rubber tape. They also make pre-booted connections like pictured which are nice
 

CobraBob

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As already mentioned, check your local building codes. You don't want to complete the wiring and then have the inspector fail it.
 

SVTdreamin04

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NEC code is the route to go to really answer your question if you have to have it inspected. If not, I would recommend using Polaris taps sine they’re insulated and just easier to work with. You can use split lugs as well.

If you plan on going the route with mechanical lugs, you can use rubber splice tape, but make sure you understand how to use it. Stretch it tight, with the sticky side out. You then wrap it in a good quality vinyl electrical tape. I prefer Scotch brand. Super 33 vinyl tape is the tape I prefer.

You can get an anti-oxidant compound at any big brand home store like Lowe’s, Home Depot or Menards.


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04DeadShort

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The short answer is yes you can. The #4 gauge has the same ampacity as #6 copper. I recommend using Polaris insulated connectors at your joint connection. Manufacturer of Aluminum and Copper set screw connectors for the Utility, OEM, and Contractor and Industrial Markets

Also I want you to consider this. Some wire is not allowable by code to be used inside a household. The insulation lacks the flame retardant that is required to be used in household. An example is SER (service entrance cable style R) has the flame retardant and is allowable. MHF (mobile home feeder) does not have it and not allowed inside a house. The issue is not the conductor (copper or aluminum) it's the insulation. The type of wire you have should be printed on the wire itself. A quick search will tell you if it is allowable or not.
 
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black4vcobra

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The real person to ask on this is the one who is going to inspect it. And someone will eventually look at it.

I don't like AL for anything anywhere...especially inside.
I even had the outside feed lines to my panels changed over to CU. I wouldn't run AL inside anything.

The fixture has a setup for copper line for a reason.

We have a few licensed electicians on SVTP.
They will show up to comment.

I can agree with idea on avoiding aluminum wiring inside.

I design transmission lines for my job and used to design substations and distribution. Aluminum provides an excellent value for transmitting electricity when comparing it to copper.

Most (not all) wires you see up in the air with any lengthy span is ACSR - aluminum conductor steel reinforced. It is composed of strands of aluminum wire wrapped around a steel core. It simply is better for designing overhead lines than copper due to it's strength and long life.
 

coposrv

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Aluminum is 100% fine when you use the Deox compound. 100% of the issues are from people who don't and the dissimilar metals corrode and when the contact gets weak it gets hot. (Its always at the connection, not the wire itself)

You are fine doing what you are doing, just use the proper deox (Penetrox) and make sure your connections are nice and tight. Use Rubber tape. They also make pre-booted connections like pictured which are nice

Noalox Hasn’t been a requirement on most aluminum cable assemblies in decades.


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coposrv

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Don’t use barrel lugs. I much prefer Polaris taps. Any supply house will have them.

View attachment 1713772

A lot more to spa install than powering it. Gfci needed. Disconnect needed. Gfci protection and a ground ring.

Hire this out.




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Brillo58

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Quite likely there may be a warranty issue if you don’t use copper. I would use copper without a doubt. I am a co-owner of an electrical wholesale distributor, been in the business my whole life. When it comes to hot tubs we always advise copper. And all of my customers..electrical contractors .. all use copper on hot tubs.
 

Brillo58

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You’ll need a spa pack which provides the GFCI protection you need as well as a service disconnect…which is all required by code.
 

matab14

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I did this same thing for our Hot Tub we have and have had 0 issues!
 

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