Death of ICE

VenomousDSG

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Carbon tax, on everything.
If you don't buy an EV, that's eventually what they are going to do on all ICE vehicles, tax the shit out of them. On top of your yearly registration tax, city sticker taxes like we pay here in Chicago on all vehicles, etc...

Already paying so much in taxes, but they keep taking more and more, slowly but surely.
 

quad

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A decade or more ago Peak Oil was quite a buzz word. It's basically the point at which production peaks and after that yields will decrease and never return to the previous high. Fossil fuel (oil) was formed when large quantities of dead organisms, mostly zooplankton and algae, were buried underneath sedimentary rock.

I used to think a lot of that oil came from dead dinosaurs (dino oil) but after I spoke with a relative (chemical engineer) who worked in Saudi Arabia for decades I realized I was mistaken. He told me most of the oil came from dead plant material and the dino oil theory was BS. Though it probably contributed a little. But he was not concerned about the supply of oil running out soon and thought there was plenty left.

Oil Comes from Dinosaurs - Fact or Fiction?

But unfortunately there's a finite amount of oil on the planet and every year there's less oil than before. Eventually it will get more expensive to extract additional oil.

I used to read up on it a lot and it seems the consensus was that the world would have to plan for a transition from oil dependence decades before Peak Oil (PO) arrives. If we waited too long and PO arrived it would be a huge problem that could lead to death via famine. Resource wars would start as countries scrambled for oil. Some people think PO has already arrived.

The decline of oil has already begun | Peak Oil News and Message Boards.

The switch to electrical power is inevitable. I also see things like tidal power plants become more important. The Earth does not have an infinite amount of materials to support huge populations for a very long time. It is actually not a very large planet.

NASA - NASA Research Confirms it’s a Small World, After All

Ocean Power Developers Made Crucial Progress in 2020

Peak Oil

What Is Peak Oil?

Peak oil refers to the hypothetical point at which global crude oil production will hit its maximum rate, after which production will start to decline. This concept is derived from geophysicist Marion King Hubbert's "peak theory," which states that oil production follows a bell-shaped curve.

In the traditional vision of peak oil, the production decline accelerates as the challenge of extracting new reserves grows. This would put pressure on existing reserves that are drawing down overtime. If new reserves are not brought on line more rapidly than the existing reserves drawdown, then peak oil has been reached. Peak oil has been declared several times, but each deceleration has proved premature because of new extraction technologies like hydraulic fracturing and better surveying revealing previously undiscovered reserves.

Peak Oil Supply and Demand
Because oil is a non-replenishing resource, there is a limit to how much the world can extract and refine. However, the scenario of total depletion is just one version of peak oil. In theory, peak oil can be brought on by the production squeeze—the drawdown as adding new reserves gets more challenging—but it can also be caused by a production decline when oil alternatives become more cost-effective, pricing oil out of the market, and making exploration and production unprofitable.


Peak Oil Predictions

There have been many predictions about whether and when the world’s oil production would peak. In 1962, Hubbert predicted that global oil production would peak near the year 2000 at a rate of 12.5 billion barrels per year. Twelve years later, he estimated that the world would hit peak oil if the current trends continued. Both his theories proved incorrect.

Some analysts and industry officials that believe we would see peak oil before 2030, but making these forecasts isn’t always easy because of the difficulty in measuring the actual size of the world’s oil reserves, especially since unconventional oil may not be expected to meet a shortfall.

Possible Consequences of Peak Oil
Some of the most obvious consequences of hitting peak oil are directly related to the economy. A drop in oil supplies will lead to a sharp spike in prices. And because many industries rely on crude oil and related products, other facets of the economy will see drastic changes. Major sectors like agriculture—which are heavily dependent on the oil industry for pesticides, fertilizers, and fuel—could see a steep decline. But the ripple effect could continue to transportation and even the food industry, which could see increases in prices. In a worst-case scenario, large areas of the world could experience famine because of higher food prices.

People rely very heavily on crude oil and its many byproducts. That means that any decrease in oil production may result in a change in our culture and technology. Because of the reliance on fuel for transportation, a drop in oil supplies may make it unsustainable for people to live in metropolitan areas unless they increase the use of alternative means of transport. The majority of the impact of peak oil would likely be felt in the lower to middle-income families.
 
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VRYALT3R3D

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Simple solution: don't buy it
There is no choice in states that have ZEV mandates. i.e. California mandating by 2035, all new cars and passenger trucks sold in California must be zero-emission vehicles.


Nearly half of the nations electricity is generated by natural gas. You know, those scary drilling rigs!
20-25% more comes from coal. Damn ole coal mines!
That's 3/4 of total current electricity being used is made by, wait for it. Fossil ****ing fuels.
These people just don't have a clue.
I also challenge any one of them to itemize EVERY SINGLE OBJECT in their home that is a petroleum derivative product. EVERYTHING.
Then, simply take all those items & toss them in the front yard. Now, walk back in the house & see what's left...
That will show the difference between reality & foolish fantasy.

OEMs are already moving to carbon neutral manufacturing and are mandating their suppliers to do the same. The electric grid will eventually be a lot more green and the electric grid will be able to expand to handle it.
 
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VRYALT3R3D

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How about this.. it's not just about eliminating I.C.E. it's about less cars on the road period.

Autonomous rideshare. People will own a car like a subscription service. You'll pay your 599$ a month or 999$ a month and it will take you to approved destinations.

I believe this is closer to the target model. We'll actually not OWN a damn thing but pay for use like a bill i.e. phone/tv/cable/auto.
Subscription services aren't working though. Many OEMs pulled out of doing them because they were not a profitable business model. Car companies are wholesalers, they are not retailers.
 

Weather Man

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There is no choice in states that have ZEV mandates. i.e. California mandating by 2035, all new cars and passenger trucks sold in California must be zero-emission vehicles.

Cally already preparing to bump that to 2030. That means in 2 years they will bump it forward again to show they are more green than everybody else.
 

blk02edge

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Grandfather laws. There is an entire industry based on old washing machines. Read up on it. The same ideas translates to the automotive world.
Nobody cares about washing machines... Our hobby must die because it's fun... Democrats idea of fun is tickling each others same sex assholes.
 

COOL COBRA

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The electric grid will eventually be a lot more green and the electric grid will be able to expand to handle it.
What? I provide facts & you quote me with more fairytales & unicorns? Eventually expand?
Didn't Texas just freeze solid due to a cold snap? Winter comes every year.
 

VRYALT3R3D

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What? I provide facts & you quote me with more fairytales & unicorns? Eventually expand?
Didn't Texas just freeze solid due to a cold snap? Winter comes every year.
Austin, Texas has a fleet of a dozen electric busses. But when that winter storm took down the Texas grid, those busses were useless. Not only does Texas need to guard its grid against extreme weather, it needs more generating capacity. But so does the whole United States. Reuters reports the U.S. needs to double its generating capacity by 2050 to accommodate EVs. The Boston Consulting Group says the average utility company needs to spend anywhere from $1,700 to $5,800 for every EV added to the grid by 2030, which would bring the total bill to $200 billion. But Reuters cites other utilities saying they can handle the transition and will not need more capacity until after 2030. One thing they all agree on: the grid needs to get greener or we won’t make progress fighting climate change.

EV rollout will require huge investments in strained U.S. power grids
 

COOL COBRA

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Austin, Texas has a fleet of a dozen electric busses. But when that winter storm took down the Texas grid, those busses were useless. Not only does Texas need to guard its grid against extreme weather, it needs more generating capacity. But so does the whole United States. Reuters reports the U.S. needs to double its generating capacity by 2050 to accommodate EVs. The Boston Consulting Group says the average utility company needs to spend anywhere from $1,700 to $5,800 for every EV added to the grid by 2030, which would bring the total bill to $200 billion. But Reuters cites other utilities saying they can handle the transition and will not need more capacity until after 2030. One thing they all agree on: the grid needs to get greener or we won’t make progress fighting climate change.

EV rollout will require huge investments in strained U.S. power grids
JFC. That quote starts with Austin, and ends with fighting climate change. I'm speechless. And I'm also out. It did make me smile though, so thanks for that.
 

VRYALT3R3D

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JFC. That quote starts with Austin, and ends with fighting climate change. I'm speechless. And I'm also out. It did make me smile though, so thanks for that.
I am sure you know better than the Boston Consulting Group and the utility companies. Whether you like it or not, EVs are coming and the infrastructure will be able to handle it. Most people don't really care about their car's propulsion system.
 

thomas91169

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EV push is simple. It’s another tool they can use to control you and your movement.

Whether the resources are there or not to support EVs has nothing to do with it.

Yup, big bait n switch.

Get the masses to buy into it hook, line and sinker, then regulate who and when they can get the power to charge or use it.

They did the same with subsidized smartphones. They knew if they charged $1200 for them out of the gate nobody would buy in, but they got us used to paying 1/10 the cost with a contract for years. Then when everyone is hooked, bam, full price and you'll pay it because you just have to have the newest shit.
 

Lambeau

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Weather Man

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Austin, Texas has a fleet of a dozen electric busses. But when that winter storm took down the Texas grid, those busses were useless. Not only does Texas need to guard its grid against extreme weather, it needs more generating capacity. But so does the whole United States. Reuters reports the U.S. needs to double its generating capacity by 2050 to accommodate EVs. The Boston Consulting Group says the average utility company needs to spend anywhere from $1,700 to $5,800 for every EV added to the grid by 2030, which would bring the total bill to $200 billion. But Reuters cites other utilities saying they can handle the transition and will not need more capacity until after 2030. One thing they all agree on: the grid needs to get greener or we won’t make progress fighting climate change.

EV rollout will require huge investments in strained U.S. power grids

All the green energy is intermittent and ladled on top of a carbon power grid being starved of investment because of green mandates. The solution? Build massive expensive battery storage sites that further starve the regular carbon infrastructure. The problem? They already don't have enough of the metal groups to build the EV battery's for cars. So as production of EV's ramp up, raw materials sky rocket and we all take it up the ass for our transportation AND power bills, ****ing awesome isn't it!?!
 

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