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How to: Install a 6-point harness in your SN95

Discussion in 'How-To' started by Tabres, Aug 7, 2015.

  1. Tabres

    Tabres Not without incident Established Member

    Messages:
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    Jan 31, 2003
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    Bloomington, Il
    I thought I would put together a quick how-to on putting in a 6-point harness in a SN95. I recognize that in general it’s a pretty basic, straight-forward installation. I just noticed that there was a lack of decent walkthroughs for harness installations in our cars when I Googled around for one so I thought I would contribute to the community.

    Disclaimer type stuff – This is meant to be used as a general guideline/reference. You should ALWAYS read the manufacturer instructions for your harness as they all tend to have their own unique rules on how they’re to be installed. There are many different ways to install harnesses and this is just what I was comfortable with on mine. Use the below information at your own discretion.

    After a fair bit of research on bang for the buck harnesses, I selected the 6-point G-Force Pro-Series camlock harness (P/N: 7101BK). It is a 3” harness with pull up lap-belt configuration and carries a SFI 16.1 rating. I’m quite pleased with the quality. The webbing appears well constructed and very strong and the stamped hardware operates smoothly. I originally purchased a Schorth Clubman harness but discovered that they are heavily backordered and would not arrive until well after the ½ mile event took place that I wanted to have the belt installed by.

    Aside from the harness itself, I purchased a few more items to complete the installation:

    (2) Racequip eye bolt P/N: 700060
    (2) G-Force Seat Belt Mount Back Up Plate P/N: 100H
    (2) Racequip Snap Hook P/N: 700030

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    I had the luxury of starting with my car having a roll-bar and side-mounted, fixed back seats already installed (not even going to touch the argument about using a harness without these items). With that, the easy place to start was by installing the shoulder belts, which I wrapped around the harness bar of my roll bar. Just follow the manufacturer’s wrapping style and it’s a quick easy job to do.

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    My next issue was how to mount the lap belt. Initially I wanted to just bolt it in to place using the stock seat belt locations and hardware. After reading the installation instructions for the harness, this would not achieve the given degree of angle that was acceptable on the lap belt. It also did not allow for an easy removal of the belt as I would have to take the seat out to get the harness out. So, as noted above, I decided to purchase a pair of eye bolts and snap hooks. These would allow me to clip the belt in an out quickly and easily.

    For the inside mounting point I was actually able to use the stock seat belt mounting location. I simply removed the factory seat belt bolt, and then measured and cut the eye bolt to equal length of the factory hardware and then installed it (which, if anyone is wondering, the stock hardware size is 7/16-20).

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    For the outside belt I needed a mounting point that was almost directly below the harness opening in my seat. I thought back to how a lot of roll-bars are installed and decided to drill a hole in the floor and mount the eye bolt through the floor using two back up plates to provide enough surface area to prevent the eye bolt from pulling through the floor in the case of an accident. As with any time you’re drilling holes in a vehicle, be sure to pull back the carpet and inspect for any wiring/fuel lines/brake lines/etc. before drilling. In my situation there were none present so it was a simple process of marking the hole, center punching it, drilling the hole and de-burring it. Following that, I suggest you take the opportunity to vacuum the metal shavings from your vehicle. You’ll also want to think about water-proofing the hole you just drilled. I chose to use gasket maker around the hole on either side of the floor, under the back-up plates. I had the gasket-maker on hand, it sets up quick and works well. Put your two back up plates in place, place your eye bolt through and tighten. Then it’s just a matter of carefully, cleanly cutting the carpet to allow the eyebolt to pass through. A sharp razor knife works well for this.

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    At this point you should only have the submarine strap to mount. For this I chose to simply use the two front seat track bolts. They’re a good mounting surface, do not cause the belt to bind anywhere and are easily and quickly accessible to remove the belt. I didn’t stop to take any photos of this, but I don’t think it warrants any further explanation.

    Now all you have left to do is mount the snap hooks to the end of your lap belts and install them in place. Beyond that it’s a matter of adjusting all of the individual belts to the proper length needed for you to strap-in. To be honest, that is what took me the longest amount of time. Once I had that completed, I rolled up the excess webbing on each belt and placed a zip tie through the roll to secure it. While not necessary, it keeps everything neat and tidy and prevents it from flapping around (note: I did this after I took the final picture).

    With the belts installed in this fashion it is safe, meets the manufacturers installation requirements, will pass tech at the track, and they’re easy to install and remove. I can have the entire harness in and out in about 2 minutes tops.

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