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Living on low income - accepting the "poor" life.

Discussion in 'Road Side Pub' started by velocicaur, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. kirks5oh

    kirks5oh kirks5oh Established Member

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    landscaping is a young man's game, not a lifetime career--
    for someone to make a career out of it, doing the hard, grunt work, is exceedingly rare.
    without benefits, or disability insurance, one simple injury (broken ankle) can literally destroy you to the point you never catch up--picture massive medical bills and being off work for 4+ months. nobody plans for this, but the chances of having something like this happen over a 30+ year career are actually quite high.
    I can't give you great career advice, other than to find a higher paying job with benefits--they are out there.
    another option is to bust your ass and finish your college degree--use it as a foundation for something other than a physical labor job. or get a technical school degree and learn a trade. any of these are an order of magnitude better than landscaping.
    that being said, its not worth it to be in a job you absolutely hate. find a job you can tolerate that allows you the luxury of doing things you truly want to do. don't hold out for the job that feels like you're not actually working---its similar to passing up on great relationships because you're looking for your soulmate.
    the balance between money/time/work/and happiness is a whole other discussion I could go on and on with. I was definitely happier when I had more time.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
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  2. Mpoitrast87

    Mpoitrast87 Well-Known Member Established Member

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    Can’t even tell you how many cars I’ve fixed cause techs couldn’t lol. But yeah, overall I’m glad I took the tech route because it can be very nice secondary income.
     
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  3. B7BlownSnake

    B7BlownSnake Active Member Established Member

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    I know most will say find a job that's your passion. I say find a job you can handle for the next 30-40 years. Maybe it's a job you hate but pays a ton. Maybe it doesn't pay shit but you absolutely love it. Just find what works for you.

    I don't have a passion for medical devices, but I do enjoy engineering. And the medical field pays pretty well. So I consider myself one of the lucky ones that does enjoy my job and get paid very well to do it.

    I skated through high school with my eyes closed. 4.0+ GPA. Was a class clown but got good grades. I knew I wanted to be an engineer, so off to UC Irvine for a BS in Mechanical Engineering. I partied a little too much, but got decent enough grades to graduate. I did well in the classes I knew I would use, but not so much in the class I never though I would need.

    Graduated in 4 years. Found a medical device engineering job at a company 2 miles from my house. I lived with my parents until I could afford to buy my own place. I made enough to buy some cars and have fun, but I got complacent. I was at this place for 6 years and only making 75k, with no real future there. My girlfriend (now wife) pushed me to find a new job. I found another, much better medical device company, and 2.5 years later I'm well above 100k (31yrs old), with a solid future outlook and big pay increases mapped out. My wife found a sales job at the same company and makes over 120k with some awesome stock deals as she's a manager.

    I enjoy expensive clothes, nice cars, nice things. That is what drives me. SO, technically money drives me. I grew up in a very well off household, and my dad busted his ass to get there. I had an amazing childhood, and a goal is to provide my son with an even better life than I had. I know I'm lucky for that, but know my dad worked very hard to provide that. I know I'm lucky to have found the job I did and found my amazing wife, but I also know I work very hard to make what I do and continue to work hard to grow.

    Wow that was long. That's what she said. But moral of the story, see my first paragraph. Also, know if you want to move up in life, nothing is handed to you. You will have to work hard. Good luck!
     
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  4. black4vcobra

    black4vcobra Well-Known Member Established Member

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    Many others have mentioned it but "poor" is a relative term. Some people are just happy with a roof over their heads and food on the table because that's how they have always lived. Since you came from a privileged background, you are now seeing the other side of it.

    Most of my childhood we were very average for the relatively affluent suburb that we lived in. Then, when I was 13 my dad and uncle started a trucking company. We went from 2 incomes to 1 and we all had to sacrifice. My mom took it the hardest as she had to work to pay all the bills and vacations, new clothes, eating out, new electronics, nice vehicles, etc was out of the question.

    Fast forward 20 years and pops makes $200k/year working 1 day a week as my uncle sold his portion of the business and the other guy has to work more to pay him back so it was worth it. Life is good for them now as the folks have 2 houses and a lake property, nice vehicles, lots of vacations, 4 wheelers, utvs, 3 boats, etc and we get to enjoy their success.

    I never wanted to struggle the way we did for a few years so i earned an engineering degree but unfortunately graduated in 2008 when the job market was on the way down. Struggled for a few years but did manage to buy a house. Ended up moving for work buying a house with my fiancee and now at 34 and 32 we are pretty comfortable and talking about kids. She doesn't make a ton of money but she's also pretty frugal so it works out. Even still, with 4 cars, nice house, boat, vacations, etc we are doing better than what our parents were doing at the same point in life so we know we are doing something right.

    Anyway, don't get hung up on material items because they may bring fun to your life, it's the things you earn (relationship, friends, fitness, job success, etc) that really bring happiness in life. And not only that, if you get hung up on material things you will compare to others and there is ALWAYS someone with more money or more toys and even though they may have more stuff, that doesn't mean they are happier.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2019
  5. Coiled03

    Coiled03 Well-Known Member Established Member

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    In the words of Mike Rowe, don't pursue your passion, pursue the opportunity. If it happens to also be a passion, all the better.

    Aside from that, it's all about perspective. Some of the happiest people I've ever met barely had two pennies to rub together. Conversely, I've met some multi-millionaires that were real assholes, and seemed bitter about everything. I struggle with it myself, sometimes, but it's helpful to be thankful, and grateful for what you have, instead of upset and bitter about what you don't.
     
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  6. AustinJ427

    AustinJ427 Well-Known Member Established Member Beer Money Bros.

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    Some good answers in here.

    Don't look at the next job as the 'one' or even the next one, or the next one- There are plenty of jobs where you can take what you learn to better yourself/career chances in the future. A job (regardless of what it is) is more than a paycheck, it's a learning experience. My old boss, when I was making $12/hr, was probably the biggest impact I have had. It was sort of a starter job, but working and learning with him has had an immensely positive change on how I work.

    Based on what I have read from your posts, I might consider going back to maintenance in hotels. The pay might not be great but as long as it's better than what you are making now and you can get the opportunity to learn from others, it could help point you into a better direction.

    I went to school with some seriously dumb mother****ers. When a buddy of mine got married I caught back up with some of them, pretty much all working at the same hotel. One of those guys, who I would have never expected to go anywhere became the director of that hotel and is making a significant chunk of change.

    There is no one good answer for everything but if I had to give the short and sweet on my thoughts here, it's to start looking elsewhere, make your superiors happy with your work and pay attention to what got them to where they are.

    Also, there is merit to staying with a company/job for 18 months I would say as the minimum. I wouldn't start bouncing around all the time to different places.
     
  7. KEVINS

    KEVINS Well-Known Member Established Member

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    If you want more money then look for another job. If you're happy where you're at then don't. All of this is easier said than done tho b/c I ponder this same issue daily. My day job as a Sr.Mechanical Designer doesn't pay squat (about $50k/yr) but unfortunately that's the norm in this city. Sales people with little/no education make 3x what I make but they have to travel a lot and can be gone for a week or more which is not what I want to do. An executive/management position requires people to work more than 40hrs a week, again not what I want.
    I always tell people that if you want a raise then get a new job b/c new jobs almost always pay more even for the same job.

    ks
     
  8. jeffh81

    jeffh81 Troll Hunter Established Member

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    Been working nowhere going jobs since i was 15 yrs old. The most i have ever made was 45k and that was a one time deal. At this current time i make 5$ a hr plus tips valeting cars so i can finally finish my degree.
    Ive lost everything in the past: home, 2 trucks, motorcycle. To get to where i wanted. I put my wife through school and shes a registered nurse make damn good money by our standards. Being poor sucks and ive been there.

    While she was in school I worked so much overtime at my state job that i was there more than i was at home just to put food on the table. With overtime i grossed 41k and that had to feed 2 people. We borrowed student loans to pay for her school and life has moved on.

    Being poor makes you learn how to adapt and overcome your situation and how to survive. I grew up with jack squat and my wife had times when she did not have food to eat.

    My best advice is to do what i did before. Work a second part time job, eat some Top Ramen and put that extra money back and get ahead
     
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  9. SirShaun

    SirShaun Well-Known Member Established Member

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    You gotta want it, then the rest will come. Make moves, stay hungry, never accept shit. It's going to be uncomfortable, but when it hits, it hits. Be brazen, nothing better than making someone uncomfortable. If you don't get what you want, at least they will remember you.

    I need to do better myself at getting out more and growing my network. Cars and Coffee, I really need to go. Sometimes landing an awesome job is half who you know, half what you know. Foot in the door is the hardest part. Lets find out more about those guys driving those exotics.

    Don't be afraid of the unknown.
     
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  10. 04YellowGT

    04YellowGT Active Member Established Member

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    Its all about perspective and drive. If you've never experienced it you don't know what your missing. Most people that live paycheck to paycheck or less don't know any different and just accept it. Wealth to some is just a dream that they consider unobtainable so they don't even try. The same is true with really wealthy people, they lose perspective of what life is like for the average Joe.

    My wife is the polar opposite of me and came from a single parent low income family. She thinks we are rich at our current income and I think we are lower middle class. I'm content with our lifestyle but I know it could be better because I came from it.

    Without going into to much detail I will say I grew up in a family that was in the 1% club. We didn't live like it for the most part but somethings were different. My dad is old school and came from nothing so he instilled hard work, responsible spending, and saving while growing up. At 18 I was actually sitting better than most people twice my age because of him teaching me to save and invest. Before I turned 20 he basically said you are ready to live on your own. He lent me money (at 6% interest) to buy an old house which is now my rental property. I moved out and had to fend for myself. After being used to living a certain lifestyle around 21 I was almost out of money and had to build my self back up. That was a real wake up call looking at my accounts to see I didn't have enough to pay my bills for the month. I refused to ask my dad for help and I promised my self I would never let that happen again. The next month I started looking for a better job and getting back to the basics my dad taught me. About 3 months later I got the job where I'm still at. It feels like a lifetime ago but it was only about 8 years and I now manage the design group I started in and live a comfortable life with a nice amount saved up.

    I'm sure my savings isn't sh** compared to some people on this site but being under 30, I'm happy and I know its only going to get better.
     
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  11. L8APEX

    L8APEX On my tummy..! Established Member

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    Find something that you can have some passion in and study while building experience. Experiance has saved my ass, cannot say the same for my certs. Make contacts with the people who know people that can hire. While big companies put restrictions, like degree requirements on applicants, Medium, often family businesses are very good at picking those who can versus those that simply have a degree. If you can deal with family politics, and you are good at what you do you'll get taken care of.
    Getting that experience is what sucks. For me in I.T. it meant many contract jobs, travel on short notice and lots of long, physical and mental workdays. I did high profile contract work for companies like Boeing IDS, GE, Philip's, Seimens, and when the end of 08 hit (I was in Harfield Jackson watching the Dow was going Hara Kiri waiting for my flight home) those contract jobs dried up within the next 2 weeks. So I took a step back, started working for a local computer repair company until things got better (never see a job as below you) and I was introduced to the right people who gave me a chance to prove myself. Even though I've moved on, I still help them on the side to this day. A wise fellow once told me its who you know that gets you the job, but it's what you know that let's you keep it.

    Sent from my Note8
     
  12. Kevins89notch

    Kevins89notch Well-Known Member Established Member

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    It's times like this, when I become even more grateful for my job. Some would say I have a shitty job, and at times, I almost question if they are right...but it pays damn well in my books. I got a college degree but was already waiting tables at a higher end place. First table tonight was a family of 12, 2 bottles of wine, a few beers, and that was $105ish in my pocket, at which I also had a family of 4 that left me $30. Not to many jobs allow for unlimited, unpaid time off. Twice in recent years I've taken off about 2 months to travel. I just give the shifts to friends. Then, like coming up in a couple days, when they are out of town, I just cover for them. Plenty would say this isn't a "career" but it also pays a lot more than plenty of people make. My sister just got a salaried job having recently left the military. I heard the figure. Another 3 weeks and my yearly income will already be more than she will make next year.
     
  13. noco5.0

    noco5.0 Active Member Established Member

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    I grew up dirt poor and hated every second of it. I decided long ago I wouldn't accept it for my own life. When I got married I told my wife she had to work. I wouldn't be married to someone that was a financial drain. Her career is going well and she now makes low six figures. I've known what I've wanted to do since I was a kid and have advanced into upper management and also make good money. We drive newer cars and live in a nice house, but don't go overboard. I think people waste a ton of money. I sock as much as I can into retirement and want to get to a point where I have enough saved that I can take the risk of doing what I want to do. I don't love work everyday, but it's work so never expected to I'm there to make a living not find fulfillment.
     
  14. Mpoitrast87

    Mpoitrast87 Well-Known Member Established Member

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    I know a few people who dropped out of college to cause they were making more money waiting tables then what they would make with a degree.
     
  15. buffalosoldier

    buffalosoldier Well-Known Member Established Member

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    Money isn't everything,
    366b63163a861e5e8008e89d50abc94c.jpg

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
     
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  16. Jack Straw

    Jack Straw Member Established Member

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    Find your local plumbers and pipe fitters union and apply for the apprenticeship program. Not easy to get in, but don’t give up and keep trying. Once you do get in its 5 years of training;schooling and on the job training. The pay, benefits and skill set you acquire is well worth the struggle.
     
  17. Equalbracket

    Equalbracket Well-Known Member Established Member

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    +1 My plumbing apprenticeship was the hardest and best thing I have ever done, it was a 4 year test of my work ethic and drive to get better all the while making the least amount of money I ever had, but I was happy and still am. I'm very lucky and fortunate to come into the situation I did. 4th generation family owned it's just me and my boss and we run circles around every other company in town, they'll have 4-5 guys and take 3 days to do a rough in that we'd finish in 5 hours, very rewarding but has become a little overwhelming maintaining this pace and already wearing on my body as I have peroneal tendonitis, but honestly I wouldn't change a thing, I'm very fortunate to not have to work if I didn't want to, but I wouldn't be happy without this job.
     
  18. ashleyroachclip

    ashleyroachclip Well-Known Member Established Member

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    Take your landscaping knowledge ,and skills , and go out on your own .
    Read an article on fox news today of a guy making a hundred grand a year doing landscape maintenance .
    I can tell you from experience, you do not have to work for some one else to make the income you want, if you have skills and incentive Good luck .
     
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  19. Equalbracket

    Equalbracket Well-Known Member Established Member

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    But skills and incentive don't equate at all to running a successful business. And in his situation that's not very good advice. Maybe if he had 20k to invest, even then competing against other companies that have 50 guys that all make $10 an hour and working 6-7 days a week, and will do it forever. There are Chiefs and there are Indians.
     
  20. Mpoitrast87

    Mpoitrast87 Well-Known Member Established Member

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    Steve Harvey gave some motivational speech before one of his shows and he was explaining how one of his childhood friends started off mowing lawns and now he owns and operates a landscaping company and he makes 800k a year.
     

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