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My RXT Install....Adjustment Tips and Cable insulation.

Discussion in 'Driveline' started by Comp04svt, May 11, 2018.

  1. Comp04svt

    Comp04svt Active Member Established Member

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    Macomb, MI
    So I purchased an RXT for my car to replace my heavy and troublesome Spec 3+. I was really between the DYAD and the RXT, but with the past Lethal Christmas sale, I couldn't pass up the deal and went with the RXT. I have a Fidanza aluminum flywheel, and purchased a replacement center section, along with new flywheel bolts, ford racing throw out bearing and ford racing pilot bearing.

    I've done a ton of research on setups, pivot ball length, and issues. I've come to the conclusion that most RXT issues are caused by improper setup and adjustment, mainly due to so many variables and opinions on whether or not an adjustable pivot is needed, or how much shorter one should set the pivot. Most of this is due to the amount of flywheel options out there, which directly effect the needed pivot ball length due to thickness of the flywheel itself. I've ran across countless threads and Facebook group posts with pivot ball length recommendations ranging from stock to 15mm shorter. So this leads to a lot of guess work, and trial/error having to pull and re install the transmission until its right. Stock flyheel and the Mcleod seem to require the least amount of shortening, and Spec/Fidanza require the most. Of course my opinion.

    The other thing is that a lot of these threads and posts here, and on Facebook seem to make this whole install way more complicated, and discouraging to some. The whole process is very simple once you get into it, and not a big deal what so ever. So I wanted to show how I set mine up, and hopefully try and take some of the guess work out for any one installing their RXT. I am not gonna go over the process for pulling the transmission and the actual procedure of installing the clutch as that's fairly basic and the same for everyone.

    Two other things that will really help you out other than a straight edge and a tape measure, is a paint pen/chalk marker and a set of break pad measurement gauges like this.
    27040638727_96fa33473b_c.jpg

    Step one, is to measure the current position of the clutch fork in relation to the fork opening. You'll want to re measure this when putting everything back together, and getting the fork in the same position, or really close, should net you similar engagement to your previous clutch setup. As shown, I measured 5 1/2".
    41866382802_ac39417cdf_c.jpg

    I always remove the transmission separate from the bellhousing. Makes things way easier. Here's the Spec.
    27040635257_48b3f6b5e1_c.jpg

    Transmission is out. I went ahead and brake cleaned everything off.
    27040638137_6f8aaa22a7_c.jpg

    Bellhousing is next. Went ahead and tied the harnesses up in the shifter opening as well.
    41866381242_f2c901736b_c.jpg

    Here is the Fidanza after getting the clutch off of it. Center section wasn't too bad after about 12,000 miles I guess. New center section comes with hardware as well. I saved this for after all the measurements are done.
    27040637707_3225dff220_c.jpg

    So now what you want to do is to place the flywheel down on a flat surface. Place the old clutch assembly down on top of the flywheel. I set the throw out bearing on the pressure plate surface to take this measurement, as the pressure plate surface is different between assemblies. It is "indented" on the spec, and not so on the RXT, so just using a straight edge would yield inaccurate measurements. Record your measurement as shown. Remove the old clutch assembly, and place the RXT in the same position. NOTE, you will have to snug up the floater/pressure plate to read an accurate measurement. Record the measurement as shown. This is where the brake pad measurement tools come in. I simply marked the tape measure in two spots. One mark for the old assembly, and another with the RXT assembly and used the pad depth tool to measure the difference. Made things simpler as most people measure the pivot ball length in mm anyways. The difference between these two measurements will be how much shorter you should set the pivot ball. This should get you damn near perfect. Also note, this picture is a rough idea of taking the measurement. You can notice my paint marks on the tape measure. You'll of course want a flat surface with no towel under anything HAHA. The RXT is 12mm taller than the Spec, per my measurement.
    27040639427_0ef8d90207_c.jpg

    Stupid me didn't take a picture of measuring and installing the pivot ball. Just a picture of the package of which pivot ball I used. Anyways, you'll measure from the face of the transmission to the tip of the stock pivot. I used the "boss" or "webbing" on the face of the transmission as my base for the tape measure. I marked this measurement on the tape measure with the paint pen. Then used the brake measurement tool, and made another mark 11/12mm shorter than my previous measurement on the tape measure. Then just install the lakewood pivot into the transmission. Using the same method as before for measuring, rotate the pivot into the transmission until the tip of the pivot ball is at the second mark you've made on your tape measure. Lock the pivot ball down, and double check you're measurement hasn't changed. 41866377212_29ac519dc4_c.jpg

    RXT in.
    41866380442_8306313432_c.jpg

    Now that you have the clutch in and bellhousing installed. Go ahead and get the transmission installed. Like me, you will most likely not be able to slide the transmission right in to the bellhousing. You will need to drop the transmission back down and re install the clutch disk alignment tool and adjust the clutch disk alignment a tad. I was able to stick my head up into the tunnel and get the disks centered as close as possible after 2 tries. You may have to wiggle the transmission around a bit while installing, but the transmission should slide in, all the way up flush to the bellhousing, without having to "draw" it in with bolts. Doing this will damage the clutch/disks.

    Hold the transmission in by a couple of snugged bolts. Take another measurement of the clutch fork position. Also take note of how much room/play you have in the clutch fork from throwout bearing contact with the pressure plate, to the transmission stops fully rearward. You want to make sure you have enough play for proper clutch operation, and room for some adjustment. Good rule of thumb is to make sure the clutch fork is slightly off center of the opening, toward the rear slightly. In my case, my clutch fork position was good compared to my previous measurement in step one. You can see the paint mark at 5 1/2" and the new mark where the fork is now. I was happy with this position visually, and as it left me with 6mm of play from throwout bearing contact with the pressure plate, to the transmission stops rearward.
    41866383602_9284da27d1_c.jpg

    I did not have to pull my transmission down to adjust anything, as I was happy with the measurements, and fork position. I went ahead and finished up installing the transmission. I set the throwout bearing to ever so slightly touch the pressure plate fingers. I know this is against what mcleod says, but I've always set my clutches this way in the past and have had no issues. I set the TO bearing to spin at half speed per-say when idling, if that makes sense.
    27040636167_a1b17f604c_c.jpg

    There you have it. This process worked out fantastic for me, so I hope it will help someone else out! I only have roughly 50 miles on it so far. This clutch really changed the car IMO, and makes the car so much more enjoyable to drive than with the Spec 3+. The clutch is butter smooth, with no noise, and the pedal is hydraulic light. Some very slight chatter once and a while, which I've read will go away with more break in. Pedal engagement is the same as with my spec, so I was happy there as well.

    So next up. With my Spec, I had a very stiff pedal obviously. What bothered me was last year, my cable broke, but in a weird spot. The cable almost "overheated" and pulled through here.
    35940421854_6f8799d384_c.jpg

    You may remember the thread I made about it a long while ago. But basically I am thinking this is a heat related issue from the long tubes, as the cable does run down pretty close. I decided to insulate the cable. This may be over kill, and not even required now that the RXT requires so much less effort to operate when compared to the Spec, or other single disc clutches. I had everything apart anyways, so I figured it wouldn't hurt. This may help other people running single disc clutches and long tubes with inconstant pedal effort concerns like I was having before.

    I purchased these products from Summit racing. I bought the MM clutch cable insulation they sell, and decided not to use it as I wanted to do the whole entire cable. The tubing is basically the same as the MM stuff, but you get more, and it's cheaper. I wanted to tape the upper portion of the cable, so it didn't stick out like a sore thumb. So I wrapped the cable in a high heat "racers" tape to make it appear more stock like. I cant say there was much difference, because I did this along with the RXT, but I feel this is just some extra insurance.
    41866378392_a2a9faa60f_c.jpg
    27040635677_7f209fa519_c.jpg

    Finished product....
    41866377732_a4fc41b4d2_c.jpg

    So, thanks for reading! Hope this helps someone out!:)
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
  2. DSG2003Mach1

    DSG2003Mach1 Premium Member Premium Member Established Member Single Barrel Sirs

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    great write up!

    I was very glad my motor and trans were out when installing my RXT and making the pivot ball adjustments. Ive been pretty happy with my RXT
     
    Comp04svt likes this.
  3. P49Y-CY

    P49Y-CY selfie deaths ftw Established Member

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    Good info, thx for sharingl

    Did you have to cut it modify the Lakewood 15503 at all?

    Did you bottom it out into the trans or was there still room left?
     
  4. Comp04svt

    Comp04svt Active Member Established Member

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    Welcome! I didn't have to modify the pivot at all. I forgot to check how much further I could sink the pivot in the transmission, but at 12mm shorter, it didn't bottom out, and I'm thinking 12mm is more toward the most people would have to go anyways.

    Sent from my [device_name] using the svtperformance.com mobile app
     
  5. ZR5.0

    ZR5.0 Member Established Member

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    Done a few RST / RXT installs into Cobras, all generally hit dead on 4.5mm shorter vs stock pivot.
     
  6. Comp04svt

    Comp04svt Active Member Established Member

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    Yes, most I've found while researching were all around that 4.5-6mm mark. Most of those people were using McLeod or stock flywheels. I've found that people using Fidanza or spec flywheels tend to need to shorten the pivot more, like I did.
     
  7. MG0h3

    MG0h3 Well-Known Member Established Member

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    I went 7-8 with the fidanza. Was odd at first as I had an RXT with the stock ball before but now I love it.


    Sent from my iPhone using svtperformance.com
     
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  8. Street Warrior

    Street Warrior SVT Power Established Member

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    @Comp04svt
    Thanks for the write up and great explanation, guess it's time to pull my trans and adjust the pivot bolt. My pivot bolt must be in too much, not enough disengagement when the peddle is pressed all the way and the TOB rides the fingers to much. I'm on that fine line of slipping under boost.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019
    Comp04svt likes this.
  9. b00sted4v

    b00sted4v Member Established Member

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    just installed my rxt and pivot ball. Pedal is loose (about an inch of slack) and the clutch grabs halfway or so. But if I take more slack out of the pedal then the clutch grabs way up high at the very end. Assuming have to adjust my pivot ball more in or out? thanks!
     
  10. Street Warrior

    Street Warrior SVT Power Established Member

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    Anyone actually measure their pivot ball? This is what I had and it’s too short. I’m trying to avoid having to do this again. Thanks
    4CDB8673-3779-4975-8EED-73A1E9D040BC.jpeg
     
  11. me32

    me32 BEASTLY SHELBY GT500 TVS Moderator

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    Great write up
     
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  12. Comp04svt

    Comp04svt Active Member Established Member

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    Yes, you would probably have to shorten the pivot some and tighten the cable up to remove some slack. You probably have a little too much "gap" between the TOB and pressure plate causing your pedal slack. These clutches to engage a tad higher than a single disc. I don't think there is much you can do about that. I would tighten up the cable to set your TOB gap in relation to the PP first before going through the pivot adjustment, then see how the position of the clutch fork is within the opening. You'll want the fork centered within the opening. After doing this and the fork is either too far forward, or rearward within the opening, then I would look into pivot adjustment. I will say that even having the clutch fork in the exact same position as with the single disc, mine does engage a tad higher than before. I've gotten used to it, and I actually prefer it this way. Makes shifting easier in all situations IMO.

    I forgot to measure mine before hand. But with the issues you're having, I would say it is too long, not too short.
     

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