rear ice tank?

jazz

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installing rear ice tank, how did u guys route the lines with the dual fan he?
 

Willie

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I asked the same question last year and received only a few responses, but with no real details and no pics. So..... I had to reinvent the wheel.

I routed my lines under the passenger side of the car.
3753.jpeg


I know you'll have further questions, so ask away. I will try to help as much as I can.
 

Catmonkey

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I've thought about the ice tank and how I'd route it. For one, I would leave everything plumbed like it came stock most of the time. When I intended to put ice in the tank, I'd unfasten the lines to the manifold and connect the lines from the trunk and by-pass the heat exchanger. I think you'd need two pumps to run it through the heat exchanger and the ice tank. If you did, I'd use the outlet from the heat exchanger to the ice tank and route the outlet on the ice tank to the manifold. If I have ice in the tank I want the cold coolant going directly into the intercooler.
 

Willie

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.... I'd unfasten the lines to the manifold and connect the lines from the trunk and by-pass the heat exchanger. I think you'd need two pumps to run it through the heat exchanger and the ice tank. If you did, I'd use the outlet from the heat exchanger to the ice tank and route the outlet on the ice tank to the manifold. If I have ice in the tank I want the cold coolant going directly into the intercooler.

Exactly what I did, but..... I use electrically controlled solenoids so I can switch from the front system to the rear system. The rear bypasses the stock reservoir, front pump and H.E. The only common component utilized by both systems is the intercooler (heat exchanger) in the intake manifold.
 

Catmonkey

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I thought about something mechanical that could be switched from one to the other, but what you did is an awesome idea. Got picks of how you did that?
 

rotor_powerd

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My lines will go through the passenger compartment and I won’t be running a heat exchanger, but it’s a race car. For a street car I would definitely have a bypass on the heat exchanger, so when you’re at the track with ice in the tank the heat exchanger doesn’t actually heat up your coolant.


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Willie

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I don't have any pics because of the compactness of the area that I put the solenoids, but here's a pic of the solenoid that I use. I suppose I could draw up a crude "schematic" of how my lines are routed if you are curious.....
Solenoid.jpg
 

Catmonkey

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No, I was more interested in the component you posted. I'll google it for more details.
 

jazz

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thanks everyone, yes drawing would be helpful willie. I'm thinking of doing from tank>pump>intercooler>he>tank
what about wiring the pump?
i just got the hoses, thinking them routing them along the fuel lines
 

jazz

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I asked the same question last year and received only a few responses, but with no real details and no pics. So..... I had to reinvent the wheel.

I routed my lines under the passenger side of the car.
View attachment 98347

I know you'll have further questions, so ask away. I will try to help as much as I can.

are your lines coming from the front close to the headers or where did you route them from?
 

Speedboosted

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In tank pump, with line running up the driver side from the tank into the manifold, then into the heat exchanger. From there it goes back down the passenger side into the tank. The heat exchanger is mostly useless in this configuration but probably prevents massive heat build up on the street.
 

Willie

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No, I was more interested in the component you posted. I'll google it for more details.

No need. Here are links. The first is normally closed and the second is normally open. I tried using one of each but found that the pumps do not act as check valves, so I had to add one more of each, or a total of four:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-2-Brass-E...448913?hash=item43de017f51:g:QzsAAOSwl8NVdf~X

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-2-Electri...230?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43a828e52e

thanks everyone, yes drawing would be helpful willie. I'm thinking of doing from tank>pump>intercooler>he>tank
what about wiring the pump?

Okay, I'll draw something up in a day or two.
As for the rear pump, I did some creative wiring. The pump itself uses 12-gauge with a 20-amp fuse. But the way it's turned on is genius!!!

are your lines coming from the front close to the headers or where did you route them from?

I think once you see my drawing, it will help a little answer this question.
 

jazz

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In tank pump, with line running up the driver side from the tank into the manifold, then into the heat exchanger. From there it goes back down the passenger side into the tank. The heat exchanger is mostly useless in this configuration but probably prevents massive heat build up on the street.


ok so which line from the heat exchanger goes back to the tank? there are two lines on the heat exchanger, the one on the bottom left and one on top in the back of the heat exchanger?
 

Willie

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Intercooler Plumbing.jpg


The red lines are the stock routing. The black lines are 3/4" heater hose. The blue lines are 1/2" OD aluminum that were bent to fit. In the trunk on the opposite site of the bulkhead connectors are -12AN lines. "NO" (normally open), "NC" (normally closed) solenoids.
 

jazz

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Thanks willie.

Whats the advanatge of keeping the stock pump? A friend of mine has it setup with the stock pump like this, tank to intercooler, intercooloer out to stock resevoir then to stock pump, pump to he in, then he out to rear tank.
Better to run that way or from intercooler out to he then he out back to rear tank?
 

Willie

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Glad to help Jazz.
There's one thing I haven't mentioned yet. I have two very accurate (to the tenth degree) digital temp gauges with the gauge senders in the two tees. This way, I can monitor water temps for both systems, at the coolest and hottest points. So let's discuss the "stock" system first. On the hottest summer day, I see intercooler fluid temps in the 120-degree range. That is with a C&L H.E. with dual fans. At the coolest point, after the H.E., the water temp is 105 - 110 degrees. This is as cool as the fluid gets and it is this temperature that cools the air intake.

So now, let's dump three bags of ice in the rear reservoir, cooling the water in the reservoir to 40 - 45 degrees. So I flip my switch to the rear system, which does not run through the front H.E. What do you think my temp gauges show now? I must allow some heating of the fluid through the lines, so let's say the temp is 50 degrees. This is now the fluid temp that is circulated through the intake mounted intercooler. Much better than 110 degrees from the front system, yes? Obviously, it is hotter than 50 degrees coming out of the intercooler but nowhere near the temp in the front system.

So why bypass the front H.E.? It's obvious. It would actually HEAT the water, not cool it. So if you invest in a rear system, I highly recommend bypassing the front H.E... If not, you'll melt your ice significantly faster.....
 

Black Cobra '99

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Glad to help Jazz.
There's one thing I haven't mentioned yet. I have two very accurate (to the tenth degree) digital temp gauges with the gauge senders in the two tees. This way, I can monitor water temps for both systems, at the coolest and hottest points. So let's discuss the "stock" system first. On the hottest summer day, I see intercooler fluid temps in the 120-degree range. That is with a C&L H.E. with dual fans. At the coolest point, after the H.E., the water temp is 105 - 110 degrees. This is as cool as the fluid gets and it is this temperature that cools the air intake.

So now, let's dump three bags of ice in the rear reservoir, cooling the water in the reservoir to 40 - 45 degrees. So I flip my switch to the rear system, which does not run through the front H.E. What do you think my temp gauges show now? I must allow some heating of the fluid through the lines, so let's say the temp is 50 degrees. This is now the fluid temp that is circulated through the intake mounted intercooler. Much better than 110 degrees from the front system, yes? Obviously, it is hotter than 50 degrees coming out of the intercooler but nowhere near the temp in the front system.

So why bypass the front H.E.? It's obvious. It would actually HEAT the water, not cool it. So if you invest in a rear system, I highly recommend bypassing the front H.E... If not, you'll melt your ice significantly faster.....

Some really good info in this thread. I have a question if you don't mind.

So for how long would the ice last until the coolant coming out of the intercooler gets to same temp as the stock system and need to be cooled down by the HE?
Note: what was the ambient temperature for the numbers you mentioned?
 

Catmonkey

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I don't have an answer for that, but I think it's going to vary with what type of ice you use. I've come across some pretty good information on ice on Yeti's website. Bigger chunks of ice are going to last longer than typical bagged ice. The real challenge is going to be how to store the ice before you need it. I don't think it will last that long once it's in the tank and the pump is cycling coolant.

Willie, one question I've got is how do you prevent smaller chunks of ice from blocking the flow out of the tank or worse yet getting in the pump?
 

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