Stock tune Trackhawk runs 10.97 (dragy)

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Here in Colorado we have warnings for 7%+ grade downhill on our mountain passes for semi trucks and people towing loads etc. Are you saying there is a track that that this guy drives at that is like a downhill ski run? I really hope you're not saying that cuz you'd look silly.

A downhill slope drag track would be sick!

With a jump at the end of course. Gotta have the jump

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SecondhandSnake

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What specifically are we looking at here? The valve bridge cracking?

You'd be amazed at some of the things we've seen in stock cals that were clearly not meant to be, or done by accident, or overlooked, etc.
Its easy to assume they should be perfect calibrations, but there's like 20 people involved in each one, multiple approvals required, etc.
Unions + calibration development = less than ideal development in many cases.

I can attest to that working in the industry. Lots of little things overlooked, weird operating conditions. You can't anticipate everything. And it's just lines upon lines of code built off of something else. Easy to miss something, especially with all those deadlines, no matter how many eyes you have on it. I wouldn't blame it on unions though. It's just the nature of software development. That's why you get revisions.
 

Diablo Mike

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What specifically are we looking at here? The valve bridge cracking?



I can attest to that working in the industry. Lots of little things overlooked, weird operating conditions. You can't anticipate everything. And it's just lines upon lines of code built off of something else. Easy to miss something, especially with all those deadlines, no matter how many eyes you have on it. I wouldn't blame it on unions though. It's just the nature of software development. That's why you get revisions.
After working with multiple calibration engineers that came to us from the Big 3, I have no problem saying unions are the issue. The stories are insane, the millions of wasted dollars are real, and the level of efficiency with which work gets done is terribly low. There is a reason our $20K cars cost $45K.
 

siLversLeigh

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After working with multiple calibration engineers that came to us from the Big 3, I have no problem saying unions are the issue. The stories are insane, the millions of wasted dollars are real, and the level of efficiency with which work gets done is terribly low. There is a reason our $20K cars cost $45K.

Are you implying the engineers are union? I'm also going to assume you've never been to an assembly plant and watched cars roll off the line every 90 seconds? How much more efficient do you suggest they could be?
 

Diablo Mike

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Are you implying the engineers are union? I'm also going to assume you've never been to an assembly plant and watched cars roll off the line every 90 seconds? How much more efficient do you suggest they could be?
I'm referring to efficiencies like, sending a guy to Alaska to do a 60 day driving test cycle then cancelling it 3 days in and letting the guy stay in Alaska for 60 days on company dime with nothing to do. Efficient measures like deciding you have nothing to do at work so you just stop going. When you show up to quit a month later your boss says hey man, where you been...I got a few paychecks here for you. I'm not talking about cranking out cars every 1.5 minutes. I'm talking about all the waste that happens to get to that point. Whether the specific employee was a union member or not, everything is based on how the Unions operate. Most of the stories are a good laugh, until you start thinking about why your new car costs so much :)
 

SecondhandSnake

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Are you implying the engineers are union? I'm also going to assume you've never been to an assembly plant and watched cars roll off the line every 90 seconds? How much more efficient do you suggest they could be?

I'm not big 3 but none of ours or most of our competitors are union. In fact the majority of white collar is non union. Manufacturing/production and hourly is union though. But we're also not UAW.

Don't forget how much is offshored or "global" as they call it now- no unions there either.

Why wouldn't the engineers be union? They are at boeing
SPEEA Website


Not sure what you're implying there but SAE is more of an industry organization for technology and standards than a union. I'm a member.
 

Dusten

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Is that why planes are so expensive?
Planes are expensive because of the sheer amount of many hours and material. Go take a tour of boeing

I'm not big 3 but none of ours or most of our competitors are union. In fact the majority of white collar is non union. Manufacturing/production and hourly is union though. But we're also not UAW.

Don't forget how much is offshored or "global" as they call it now- no unions there either.





Not sure what you're implying there but SAE is more of an industry organization for technology and standards than a union. I'm a member.

I'm implying that engineers can be union and are in some manufacturing.
 

SecondhandSnake

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The head is cracked and there is a lot of detonation damage on the ground electrode and some on the cylinder head.

Valve bridge cracks are pretty common- it's generally the highest stress area of the head. The question is if it's superficial or to the water jacket. Superficial ones aren't that uncommon and are often deemed "acceptable" from a service perspective. And that sort of failure is less about the combustion chamber conditions than the cylinder head design. Just based on my experience with those cracks and cylinder head design.
 

ArabianOak

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Valve bridge cracks are pretty common- it's generally the highest stress area of the head. The question is if it's superficial or to the water jacket. Superficial ones aren't that uncommon and are often deemed "acceptable" from a service perspective. And that sort of failure is less about the combustion chamber conditions than the cylinder head design. Just based on my experience with those cracks and cylinder head design.

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