And people were talking smack about the Ford GT racecar

GloomySVT

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Yea, that "pathetic" Taurus motor outlasted the competition, but I guess that doesn't mean anything since "It ain't a V8." :burn::kaboom:

http://autoweek.com/article/imsa/ford-gt-makes-imsa-sportscar-history-shank-team-returns-victory-lane-leguna-seca

THE FORD GT GOT A BIG WIN ON SUNDAY IN THE GT CLASS

Ford broke through with a first-time win for the Ford GT at the Continental Monterey Grand Prix at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca Sunday, but Ford wasn’t the car and the manufacturer most were expecting to own the day.

Practice and qualifying strongly suggested Mazda would finally break through with its first series win in Prototype, but that didn’t happen -- it was a savvy drive by Ozz Negri and gentleman driver John Pew in the No. 60 Michael Shank Racing Honda-powered Ligier JS P2 that made it to the checkered flag a whopping 30.099 seconds over the second-place car, the No. 90 Visit Florida Chevrolet Daytona Prototype of Ryan Dalziel and Marc Goossens, in the car that won last year’s race in Monterey.

Third was Eric Curran in the No. 31 Whelen Action Express Corvette DP he shares with Dane Cameron. Curran was just 0.855 second behind the No. 90.

It was the first win for the No. 60 team since the 2012 Rolex 24 at Daytona. “It’s been a long time,” Pew said. “I feel like a curse has been lifted.”

It was supposed to be Mazda’s day at its home track. The two Mazda Prototypes qualified on the front row and led easily early in the race, with the No. 55 of Tristian Nunez and Jonathan Bomarito staying just ahead of the No. 70 of Tom Long and Joel Miller. The two Mazdas stretched out a full-straightaway lead over third place several times, but it all went wrong when the Prototypes made their first pit stop.

The stop for the 70 was just slow, and for the 55 even worse, as the fuel nozzle wouldn’t seat properly. After that, everything went wrong: The No. 70 stopped on track with oil pressure problems, and Bomarito spun the No. 55 when trying to make a pass. The No. 70 ended up finishing last, while the No. 55 was fourth.

In the GT Le Mans class -- the Prototypes and GTLM cars were split into one race, the Prototype Challenge and GT Daytona cars into another due to pit lane capacity -- the No. 67 Chip Ganassi Racing Ford GT took the win with drivers Ryan Briscoe and at the end, Richard Westbrook.

Westbrook made it a stunning 52 laps on his last tank of fuel, nursing the car to the checkered flag on fumes. But saying it was entirely a fuel mileage victory isn’t fair -- Ryan Briscoe’s best lap was only a split-second behind the fastest car, the second-place No. 68 Scuderia Corsa Ferrari of Daniel Serra and Alessandro Pier Guidi, which qualified on the pole, and the No. 4 Chevrolet Corvette C7.R.

That Corvette of Oliver Gavin and Tommy Milner finished fourth, just behind the No. 912 Porsche North America Porsche 911 RSR of Earl Bamber and Frederic Makowiecki.

Westbrook was as surprised as anyone that he was able to squeeze that much out of his car. “They tell you a (lap) number and you think, ‘You’re kidding, you’ve been drinking too much,’” but then Westbrook went out and did it.

“It just seemed to be our day,” Westbrook said, but they still had to overcome a problem -- the car was stuck in first gear during a pit stop “and that cost us five or six seconds, which is five or six places.”

His sister car, the No. 66 Ford GT of Joey Hand and Dirk Mueller, came in for a quick splash of fuel at the end, dropping them to sixth in class, 12th overall. They had no choice, said Ford chief engineer Mark Rushbrook -- the No. 66 was on a different pit strategy, and didn’t have quite enough fuel at the end to stretch it like the No. 67 did.

The hardest-working car and drivers were Ryan Dalziel and Marc Goossens in the No. 90 Visit Florida car, which ran poorly all weekend and started the race last due to being too late to the starting grid, meaning they had to start from pit lane and also suffered a drive-through penalty.

“We’re glad we got back on the podium,” Dalziel said, “but this car won here last year and we have some work to do on this package.”

“It was quite an eventful race,” Goosens said. “I kept an eye on the mirror” for the fast-approaching No. 31 at the end, but Goosens concentrated on making no mistakes, and that was the key for the strong finish.

Next up for the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship: The Chevrolet Sports Car Classic Presented by the Metro Chevrolet Dealers in Detroit on June 3-4.
 

earl lee

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It finally won a race, congrats. No need to revisit the prior races where it DNF or was busy catching on fire.

Now im not bashing the Ford GT as issues are EXPECTED for a completely new car. Just dont start acting like the ones that are hating on the car because it finally won a race.
 

GloomySVT

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It finally won a race, congrats. No need to revisit the prior races where it DNF or was busy catching on fire.

Now im not bashing the Ford GT as issues are EXPECTED for a completely new car. Just dont start acting like the ones that are hating on the car because it finally won a race.

Going from DNF to winning is a big deal. It shows that with most of the major issues ironed out, the car can, and will outperform the competition.
 

LS2GTO

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I'll give Ford credit when and where it's due, and a win is a win. But just because it one once does not make it the pinnacle of motor racing. Everyone has a chance to win in this type of racing.

When a 0-15 football team finally wins in their last game you don't see many crowning them champs do you? Win a bunch of times, outperform the competition all year long and then you'll be crowned champs or whatever. But after a win now all of a sudden this is the shit? Cmon.
 

oldmodman

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Every car has teething problems.

Even the almighty 1964 & 65 Ford GT40 didn't win (or place) in it's first race. Sure, it cleaned up in 66 & 67.

And the first Porsche 935's caught on fire the first time out. Then they went on to win, and keep winning for another decade.

Will the new Ford? Time will tell. But I sure wish they had designed a new V-10 instead of using the V-6 so they could compare it to the Ecoboost in your truck.
 

Blown 89

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Circuit racing is tough. The people complaining are usually armchair quarterbacks who have never tried it.
 

Voltwings

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I know i'm probably the only person impressed by this, but there is a ton of strategy involved in racing and you have to look at the big picture.

Laguna Seca is a 2.214 mile course, and the cars are limited to 500 horsepower, with a racing weight of 2745 (according to this website i found): http://www.imsa.com/imsa101/car-classes

Take into account the 52 laps on the last tank of gas, that's 115.128 miles. I couldn't find what the fuel tank capacity is, but even if the tank is as large as 20 gallons, that's about 6 mpg. Doesn't sound very good, but my 280 whp 3200 lb Mazdaspeed3 averages the same when i'm on track lol, and this car has double the power. If you can outlast the competition and have fewer pit stops, you increase your chances of winning. Horsepower is a small part of winning races, getting things to last; tires, brakes, fuel... that is how you win.
 

Serpent

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Circuit racing is tough. The people complaining are usually armchair quarterbacks who have never tried it.
+1
All they know is straight line racing, and moar power is better!!!! Power = pinnacle according to the Pinnacle mustang thread.

I wonder when there will be an American F1 driver that is #1.
 
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Coiled03

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I wonder when there will be an American F1 driver that is #1.

No time in the near future. We don't have nearly enough structure in place for someone to become a legitimately good road racer, here. When I say structure, I mean it relative to feeder series' that grow a driver's skills. Sure, we have IRL, Indy Lights, and some sports car racing. But none of those would prepare a driver for GP2, much less F1, imho.

That's why anyone who wants to drive F1 moves to Europe.
 

AustinSN

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All they know is straight line racing, and moar power is better!!!! Power = pinnacle according to the Pinnacle mustang thread.

I wonder when there will be an American F1 driver that is #1.

The good American drivers usually get picked up by Nascar.
 

03Sssnake

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All they know is straight line racing, and moar power is better!!!! Power = pinnacle according to the Pinnacle mustang thread.

I wonder when there will be an American F1 driver that is #1.

I do not see that happening any time soon, can only think of Mario Andretti who became an American and Phil Hill whom was the only American born driver to become an F1 champ.... There is no feeder series/farm system here like in Europe. The constructors, engineers, aerodynamicists, engine and drivetrain experts are mostly based in the UK and other parts of Europe. A young driver here would basically need to move to Europe and progress from karting to GP2 and maybe eventually a shot at an F1 drive.

EDIT: I see Coiled03 beat me to it :beer:
 
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thomas91169

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I know i'm probably the only person impressed by this, but there is a ton of strategy involved in racing and you have to look at the big picture.

Laguna Seca is a 2.214 mile course, and the cars are limited to 500 horsepower, with a racing weight of 2745 (according to this website i found): http://www.imsa.com/imsa101/car-classes

Take into account the 52 laps on the last tank of gas, that's 115.128 miles. I couldn't find what the fuel tank capacity is, but even if the tank is as large as 20 gallons, that's about 6 mpg. Doesn't sound very good, but my 280 whp 3200 lb Mazdaspeed3 averages the same when i'm on track lol, and this car has double the power.

I think you are looking at it wrong. If that car wanted to drive the same lap times your MS3 does, it would do so with triple the mileage. It could literally not go WOT an entire lap and still put down better times. But his car puts down times that would probably lap you within three laps.
 

Blown 89

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+1
All they know is straight line racing, and moar power is better!!!! Power = pinnacle according to the Pinnacle mustang thread.

I wonder when there will be an American F1 driver that is #1.
That too. What I meant is that circuit racing is very hard on the vehicles and getting to the finish line is no easy task. I spend 90% of my day frantically fixing things so that it actually runs and 10% driving.
 

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